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Who loves boats, being on the water with friends and family and lighted boats?!?!
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Some of the Lighted Boat Parades along the Gulf coast and Tampa Bay for December 2018:
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Apollo Beach Lighted Boat Parade
December 1st, from 6-9pm
Tampa Sailing Squadron is the host for this community event. There’s good viewing from the docks. Hamburgers and Hot dogs will be available to purchase.
Bradenton Christmas on the Braden River
December 1st, starts at 6pm
The 5th annual holiday board parade with start at Jiggs Landing, the parade will start upriver at 630pm and will end at approximately 730pm at Linger Lodge.
Dunedin Holiday Boat Parade
December 1st, from 6-9pm
Decorated boats parade through the Marina at approximately 7pm. Enjoy holiday music and smores while the kids wait for Santa to arrive by boat to lead the countdown to the tree lighting.
St. Pete Beach/Vina Del Mar
December 1st, starts at 530pm
The parade starts at Pass a Grill at Merry Pier and Sea Horse Restaurant at dusk. Santa will be there for pictures. Firemen will be grilling hamburgers and hot dogs.
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St Petersburg’s 32nd Annual Illuminated Boat Parade is canceled for 2018Thanks, Troy Willingham President, Rotary Club of St Petersburg for getting the info out.

Tarpon Springs Boat Parade
December 7th, from 7-9pm
The parade starts down the Anclote River and into the bayous where Santa will give out treats. The best viewing is from Craig Park/Spring Bayou.
Madeira Beach Festival of Lights
December 6th Starts at 630pm
The parade begins on the north side of town and work through the canals to Johns Pass.
Clearwater, Islands Estates Yacht Club Boat Parade
December 8th, starts at 630 pm
The Island Estates Yacht Club Boat Parade is one of the largest and most popular parade. This is their 43rd year. The parade will start in Mandalay Channel and head north and weave in and out of the canals and out to Coachman Park around 8pm. They travel under the Memorial Causeway Bridge turning into the Marina.
Gulfport Lighted Christmas Parade
December 8th Starts at 6pm
The parade starts at the Gulfport Municipal Marina and out into the bay. The parade travels through Town Shores, Kipps Colony and Pasadena Yacht & Country Club on its way to Isla del Sol
Treasure Island Holiday Boat Parade
December 14th, starts at 620pm (Note the Treasure Island Bridge will close at 7pm to allow the boats to pass under it)
Experience the 31st anniversary of the Treasure Island Boat Parade. Best public viewing areas are 115th street, Treasure Island Causeway Bridge, Kingfish Drive at John’s Pass (Gators) and Blind Pass Bridge.
Indian Rocks Beach Holiday Lighted Boat Parade
December 15th, starts at 7pm decorated boats parade through the waterways
Redington Beach/Indian Shores Holiday Boat Parade
December 17th, starts at 6pm
Decorated boats travel through the intra-coastal waterways from Tom Stuart Causeway to the Pub restaurant in Indian Shores
Tampa Bay, Riverwalk Boat Parade
December 22nd, starts at 630pm
Watch the parade as they go from Davis Island, Harbour Island and the Channelside Distirct. You can watch from Channelside Bay Plaza and enjoy the parade from the open wharf.
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Local artist alternative holiday market in St Petersburg, Florida waterfront park

Takes place in South Straub Park November 24.  Shop local. Support local. Enable the makers and collectors in the Sunshine City to prosper while picking up a totally unique gift for a loved one. 10-5pm for more info:  https://www.facebook.com/events/374707542937157/

Santa Parade & Tree Lighting
The parade begins at Albert Whitted Park, 480 Bayshore Dr. SE., and runs along Bayshore Dr. to Fifth Ave. N. Following the Santa Parade, Mayor Rick Kriseman lights up the downtown waterfront around 8pm in North Straub Park for St. Petersburg’s annual Tree Lighting. Stay after the Santa Parade & Tree Lighting to enjoy a night in the park with games, a marching band performance, concessions and more! Starts 5:30pm. Take the downtown looper FREE to avoid the hassle of looking for parking along Beach Drive.

We are thankful for this!

The newest member of the Pinellas International Council! Thank you, Brian Woods and Sharon Woods, for the great photos!! Love it. Jason is so cute!!

Thanks, Dad and all others who have served over the years. With much appreciation, gratitude and respect.  Armistice Day is commemorated every year on 11 November to remember the peace treaty signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France —the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918. It is a national holiday in France, and was declared a national holiday in many Allied nations. In some countries Armistice Day is on the same day as Remembrance Day and Veterans Day. As Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada said as he dropped his umbrella in 2017, ”As we sit here in the rain, thinking how uncomfortable we must be these minutes as our suits get wet and our hair gets wet and our shoes get wet, I think it’s all the more fitting that we remember on that day, in Dieppe, the rain wasn’t rain, it was bullets.” Again, my humble thanks.

apple.news/AKB8omMhCTZmhbHphEc70hQ

 

As a festival that brings nearly 200,000 people to St. Pete every year, St. Pete Pride‘s commitment to No Straws St. Pete means a great deal. It’s just the latest in a number of impressive commitments to the movement which is growing, not only in St. Pete, but across Tampa Bay.

https://ilovetheburg.com/st-pete-pride-commits-to-no-straws-movement/

“How can we call ourselves St. Pete Pride without having pride in St. Pete,?” said St. Pete Pride board member, J. Aller. “For us as a board, it just made sense to align ourselves and the event with ‘No Straws St. Pete.’ We love our beautiful waterfront city and have a responsibility to help keep it pristine for years to come. Each beverage and food vendor was asked and strongly persuaded to refrain from freely giving straws to parade and festival goers. If a vendor agrees, they will be given a plaque to display their participation.”

The news comes on the heels of recent commitments by the newly opened Lucky’s Market as well as all three Hooters locations in St. Pete and follows the support of other major events including Run Fest St. Pete. While we’ve aimed to keep tabs on all of our partners, we’re learning new ones daily that have simply committed to the idea of making straws available only on request.

At a recent committee hearing at City Hall, councilwoman Wheeler-Bowman cited the movement’s impact on businesses saying she didn’t get a straw with her drink at a recent trip to Joey Brooklyn’s Pizza.

Pete Boland, owner of The Galley, commended the movement’s impact on the consumer saying guests are specifically requesting “no straw please” with their drinks.

As we have said all long, our partners are capable of educating the public simply by making the commitment. With thousands of people descending upon St. Pete for Pride, the impact of their commitment will be felt immediately.

That’s great news for our planet and the Burg, indeed.

https://ilovetheburg.com/st-pete-pride-commits-to-no-straws-movement/

Hope you are all enjoying a wonderful holiday weekend with your families and friends!

May we all be filled with harmony, joy and love throughout the world.

 

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Happy New Year     Feliz año nuevo     Bonne année 

Frohes neues Jahr      Feliz Ano Novo    Godt nytt år     Gëzuar Vitin e Ri 

 新年快         Gelukkig nieuwjaar      Ευτυχισμένο το νέο έτος   Tau Hou hari

Felice anno nuovo    Shona Bhliain Nua     明けましておめでとうございま

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New Year’s is the oldest holiday still being celebrated. The Babylonians celebrated the New Year as early as 4000 B.C. At that time, the New Year began on the first new moon after the Vernal Equinox. The celebration continued for eleven days, with each day having a different purpose and activity.

Some of the most widely used superstitions include the following: Kissing at midnight to ensure that the affections & relationships that we have made will continue for the next year. Filling up your refrigerator & pantries with food to ensure that you will have plenty of food throughout the next year. Putting money in every wallet in the house to ensure prosperity.  Also all of your bills should be paid before New Year’s Day to ensure that prosperity will be welcomed in your home but do not pay any bills on New Year’s Day or you will ensure a year of paying nothing but debts. You should not eat beef because cows mostly stand still. You should not eat poultry because they scratch backwards. Pigs, however, constantly root forward for food. So if you eat pork on New Year’s, you will be moving forward in a positive manner throughout the year. Wearing new clothes will increase your chances of receiving more clothes. Throughout the world the custom of making noise to ring in the New Year has not changed since ancient times as this is to scare off any evil spirits.

In Britain the custom of first footing is practiced. The first male visitor to the house after midnight brings good luck. Usually they bring a gift of money, bread, or coal, to ensure the family will have plenty of these things all the year to come. The first person must not be blond, red-haired or women as these people are supposedly bad luck. SO, I better not be the first person to cross your threshold, being a blonde woman!!

The Druids gave a gift of mistletoe, the sacred source of fertility. It would give you a fruitful year in the number of children, cattle and crops and thus wealth.

In Ireland the direction of the wind blowing at New Year would indicate the trend of politics in the coming year. If it blew from the west it would bring the Irish good luck, if from the east the English would have the luck. Also on New Year’s Eve if they ate a very large supper they would have plenty of food for the coming year.

In France dinner parties are thrown for the entire family customarily include special dishes like foie gras, oysters and champagne. They exchange kisses and wishes, saying, “Bonne Année”, Bonheur, Sante, Amour, Argent (“Good Year”, Happiness, Health, Love and Money).

In Germany people would drop molten lead into cold water to tell the future from the shape it made. A heart or ring shape meant a wedding, a ship a journey, and a pig plenty of food in the year ahead. People also would leave a bit of every food eaten on New Year’s Eve on their plate until after Midnight to ensure a filled pantry. Carp brings wealth. Traditionally jelly filled doughnuts with or without liquor fillings are eaten. Finally a tiny marzipan pig is eaten for more good luck. (Hmmm, eating a lot & eating pig seems to be a recurring theme.)

In Denmark they stand on chairs and then jump off them at midnight. Leaping into January is supposed to banish bad spirits and bring good luck.

January 1st is an important date in Greece because it is not only the first day of the New Year but it is also St. Basil’s Day. St Basil was one the founders of the Greek Orthodox Church, who was kind and generous to the poor. St Basil’s cake, baked with a silver or gold coin inside, is eaten. Whoever receives the coin will have good luck throughout the year. Pomegranates & grapes also bring good luck.

Italians call New Year’s Eve Capodanno (the “head of the year”). Traditionally, they wear red underwear.  A lentil stew is eaten when bell tolls midnight – one spoon per bell. This is supposed to bring good fortune; the lentils represent coins.

In Spain celebrations usually begin with a family dinner, including shrimp, lamb or capon. Wearing new, red underwear on New Year’s Eve brings good luck. It is traditional to eat twelve grapes, one on each chime of the clock, make a wish and then toast with sparkling wine such as cava or champagne. This tradition started in 1909, when grape growers in Alicante needed a way to get rid of the large surplus of grapes they had had that year.

In Puerto Rico and in parts of South America children enjoy throwing pails of water out the window at midnight. Some believe that this rids their home of any evil spirits.

In Bolivia families make beautiful little wood or straw dolls to hang outside their homes to bring good luck.

In Brazil the lentil is believed to signify wealth, so on the first day of the New Year they serve lentil soup or lentils and rice. The lentils are supposed to resemble coins. Grapes are also eaten. Brazilians traditionally dress in white, to bring good luck into the New Year.

Mexicans celebrate New Year’s Eve, Año Nuevo, by eating 1 grape while making a wish with each of the twelve chimes during the midnight countdown. Homes and parties are decorated with colors such as red, to improve lifestyle and love, yellow to improve employment conditions, green to improve finances and white to improve health. Mexican sweet bread is baked with a coin or charm hidden in the dough. When the bread is served, the recipient whose slice contains the coin or charm will have good luck in the New Year. Another tradition is to make a list of all the bad or unhappy events from the current year and before midnight throw it into a fire, symbolizing the removal of negative energy from the New Year.  At the same time, thanks are given for all the good things.

In Costa Rica in addition to eating the 12 grapes, they run across the streets with luggage asking for new trips and adventures in the upcoming year.

In Venezuela, many of the traditions are very similar to the ones from Spain. Those who want to find love in the New Year wear red underwear and yellow to have happiness.  If you want money, you must have a bill of high value when it is time to toast and if you want to travel, you must go out carrying some luggage.

In India people try to finish uncompleted work and pay off all debts before the end of the year. People buy new things for their homes or new clothes.  Animals are washed, groomed and decorated for the festival.

Chinese New Year is celebrated on the second new moon after the winter solstice. Firecrackers and noisemakers will chase away evil spirits. The fabulous dragon and lion will dance in the streets. People will wear red, the most auspicious of colors, and red envelopes with lucky money will be given to children. Tangerines are often given for good luck, but odd numbers are unlucky, so the tangerines are given in pairs.

It is traditional in Japan to spend a full week preparing for the New Year to arrive. The house must be thoroughly cleaned and all debts must be paid. All disagreements must be resolved and forgiven. Before midnight, 108 bells ring, to symbolize the elimination of 108 troubles. With no troubles, disagreements, debts, or disorder to contend with, all are free to welcome in the New Year with every expectation of peace and prosperity. The day after New Year’s is First Writing Day, when people write their hopes and dreams for the New Year.

Round shapes (representing coins) bring prosperity for the coming year in the Philippines. Families have large amounts of round fruits on the dining table and eat exactly 12 fruits at midnight (grapes). Some wear polka dots for luck.

In the USA black-eyed peas and rice called Hoppin’ John is eaten. An old saying goes, “Eat peas on New Year’s day to have plenty of everything the rest of the year.”  Most people toast with champagne at midnight. The dropping of the ball from the top of Times Square in New York City started in 1907.  The custom came from the time signal that used to be given at noon in harbors. New Year’s Eve is traditionally the busiest day of the year at Walt Disney World Resort in Florida and Disneyland in Anaheim, California.

Well, I need to go now and get my things in order to ensure that I have the best New Year ever.  I’m off to the store to buy some black-eyed peas, greens, lentils, grapes, and champagne. When I return I must make sure to put money in each wallet in the house. Then I will make sure to wear red, yellow, green and white. At the first stroke of midnight while jumping off a chair and holding a suitcase, I will be eating 12 grapes and making 12 wishes, hoping that I don’t choke or fall on my head. Yikes, I can’t forget the kisses! Wow, I certainly will be quite an interesting sight on New Year’s Eve. Ridiculous photos to follow, I’m sure. So Happy New Year to you all. I wish you happiness, good health, wealth and great friends to enjoy throughout the year!

 

Sunday, December 3rd, the moon will seem larger and brighter than it has all year.  A “super moon” apparently happens when the moon is full and is at the same time the closest to the Earth during its orbit so it seems brighter than usual.

The Super Moon will be here on December 3rd and is also call a “Full Cold Moon” as it is  the first full moon of December or winter. It should shine approximately 16 percent brighter and 7 percent larger than normal, according to National Geographic. Then we will have a full moon on January 2 and then again on January 31. So we will have a BLUE moon in January. A BLUE moon is when a full moon occurs twice in the same month, which is pretty rare. Usually, we have 12 full months per year but 2018 will have 14 full moons-the other will be March 31st. How cool is that?

Astronomers say that the best time to see the Super moon is in the early evening just as the moon is rising and in the early morning as it is setting. You can guess when I will be looking at the Super Moon.

 

Other moons have special names that have been around for thousands of years, each name reflects what time of year it is:

January is Wolf Moon is named after the sound of hungry wolves. Native Americans and medieval Europeans would recognize their howls as a sign of midwinter. So January 3rd will be a Wolf Super Moon & January 31st will be a Blue Super Moon. Awesome!

February is the Snow Moon. Obvious.  

April is the Pink Moon.  Northern Native Americans called it this because of the early blooming wildflowers. Nice.

September is the Harvest Moon-traditional time for gathering of crops.

November is the Beaver Moon. Algonquin tribes set beaver traps for the winter fur supply & keeping warm.

Happy Holidays, however you celebrate!

Below is a list of some of the various holiday events going on in December 2017 throughout Tampa and Ibor City.

From movies in the park to Twilight 5k runs,

from boat parades to Chanukah festival fun,

a lot of good things for everyone!

 

Holiday Happenings

Annalisa Weller, Realtor®, Certified International Property Specialist

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