You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘France’ category.

 

 

Original luke bender 577747 unsplash.jpg?1520549056?ixlib=rails 0.3

Sailing isn’t just another way to get around—it grants you access to places, communities, and experiences that other travelers often miss.

Sailors are the masters of their travel time: They can go (almost) anywhere in the world on a whim and always receive a warmer reception than that afforded to mere tourists. Like a fraternal club that doesn’t advertise, they rendezvous at those select locales known for great sailing weather and a welcoming attitude toward visiting boats. Once at anchor, sailors have access to everything else a new port has to offer, including cosmopolitan nightlife, tropical beaches, or national wildernesses. Whether you’re a seasoned sailor or a landlubber looking to charter a boat and dip your toes into the lifestyle, you’ll want to head to one of these seven islands. Not only are they beloved by the sailing community, but they also have plenty of non-nautical charms that’ll have you returning time and time again.

1. Azores, Portugal

For 500 years the Azores have been the first land sailors touch after long west-to-east routes across the Atlantic as they near the Iberian Peninsula. It’s traditional for captain and crew of each arriving boat to pass through sailing’s most legendary meeting spot, Peter’s Café Sport, which opened in 1918. Crew members looking to exchange their labor for one-way passage lurk in the café, while leisure visitors sit back and soak up the atmosphere. The islands are known for their dramatic landscapes and peaceful fishing villages, but come as a sailor rather than a fly-in tourist to experience a truly welcoming, fraternal atmosphere on this island run by sailors for sailors.

The interior of Réunion, protected by a ring of ridges, hides great hiking trails and stunning waterfalls.

2. Réunion, France

Five hundred miles off the east coast of Madagascar, Réunion rises out of the Indian Ocean like a steep-sided salad bowl. Twin volcanoes, Piton de la Fournaise and Piton des Neiges, poke holes 8,600 and 10,000 feet into the sky, respectively. Hiking trails lace the wilderness around them, and the slopes attract climbers, cavers, and canyoneers. Tickets from JFK or LAX often run $2,000 or more to this remote tropical island filled with rain forests and surrounded by coral reefs, and the trip takes more than 24 hours of plane-hopping. Instead, pilot your own boat into the arms of a large sailing community and enjoy the best harbor facilities in the Indian Ocean, according to Noonsite, an online sailors’ database of routes and destinations.

3. Bermuda

Every even-numbered year, more than 150 privately owned sailboats depart Newport, Rhode Island, for a 635-mile race to Bermuda as part of the most famous amateur yacht race in the world, the Bermuda Race. Competition is relaxed, and honor goes to any who compete regardless of a win, so ready your boat (or talk your way onto somebody else’s) for the 51st event, running on June 15. The camaraderie and instant community alone are enough to make anyone fall in love with sailing. Once you’re docked in Bermuda, be sure to weave past the harbors’ forests of steel boat masts to the 20-square-mile island’s interior, and check out a few of the more than 90 remaining British forts, the earliest of which was built in 1612.

The coves and inlets of Rhodes’s rocky coastline are best explored by boat.

4. Rhodes, Greece

The most famous waters in Western history also happen to be in the sunniest part of Greece. The people of Rhodes have hoisted sail into the winds since before Homer recounted their meddling in the Trojan War 3,000 years ago. Closer to the Turkish coast than to the Greek mainland, it’s home to the oldest inhabited medieval town in Europe, the Old Town in the city of Rhodes. The island’s rocky coastlines, suited to the medieval fortifications bricked into them, make for a break of scenery from typical, flat stretches of white sand in the Mediterranean, although the natural harbors make for beautiful beaches, too. With mild Mediterranean winds and currents, Rhodes is famous for its pleasant sailing conditions, making this the perfect place to brush up on your captaining.

5. Santa Catalina Island, California

Because of its jagged coastline, limited number of natural harbors, and hazardous wind conditions, sailors are less inclined to frequent the Pacific Coast of the United States than they are the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. But Santa Catalina, a desert island 20 miles off the coast of Los Angeles, is a haven for boat life in the region. It’s also a paragon of raw nature: The Catalina Island Conservancy protects 85 percent of the island’s 75 square miles. Bison roam wild on land and whales swim in the natural harbors. Avalon, the only town, keeps car traffic to a minimum by restricting each household to only one ultra-small vehicle—think classic VW Beetle or golf cart.

The capital of Aruba is colorful in more ways than one.

6. Aruba

The cactus-strewn desert island of Aruba is the last Caribbean stop for many private boats heading through the Panama Canal and out to the Pacific Ocean. It sits outside the hurricane belt that sweeps up so much of the region, which makes it a perfect refuge for off-season sailors. (Hurricane season runs from June to November.) Dutch-flavored capital Oranjestad is a cosmopolitan city of rainbow-hued colonial buildings and is known to punch above its weight with trendy after-hours nightlife. You’re as likely to hear English, Spanish, and French spoken by locals as you are the official Dutch and Papiamento creole; from Aruba’s more tropical southern shore, you can easily see Venezuela, just 15 miles away.

7. Key West, Florida

Too often overlooked by sailors eager to enter the Caribbean’s foreign waters, laid-back Key West is exactly the scenic backdrop of tropical beaches and turquoise sailing waters U.S. residents seek in other countries. If Key West weren’t within our borders, it would rank a lot higher on sailing itineraries. Sailors who crave foreign shores can easily skip over to The Bahamas at daybreak and arrive by lunch, but the mellow Keys have all the sugar sand and palm trees you could want.

Article by Matt Jancer in  https://www.afar.com/magazine/7-islands-that-will-make-you-want-to-buy-a-sailboat?inspiration=outdoor-adventure&sub_inspiration=water-sports

 

 

Bordeaux Trade Mission meeting this Friday May 11th in the Conference room at Coastal Properties Group office, 437 High Street. Dunedin: 12-1.30 pm. We will have Bordeaux wine and strawberries. See you there. Please text RSVP to Marina Kloppel 858-382-7499.

 

 

 

What a great opportunity to make business connections in the Bordeaux region of France while enjoying the beautiful landscape, food, wine and, of course, the graciousness of the people!

If you are interested in being of part of this adventure, you must act quickly-the deadline for reserving your place on a trip of lifetime is AUGUST 30th. 

 

Please contact Marina for more information.

 

 

 

 

IMG_1467

Le Louvre photo by Annalisa Weller, 2009

 

The following museums were found on several lists as the most visited in 2015 around the world. I was quite surprised to find out that I have visited 7 of the 10. My travels have not brought me to Asia yet so that removes Numbers 2, 8 & 10 for me. Better get to work on that! My daughter just returned from China so “we” could use the familial visits to check off  another one on the list-not really.

IMG_3212

National Gallery of Art, photo by Annalisa Weller, 2015

 

I would, however, like to add the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., which opened in 1937. As I a child I was lucky to live close to DC & so we visited it quite often. Last year while in Washington, DC for business, I spent the afternoon in the National Gallery of Art with my family. As I turned the corners, I would get a glimpse of some of my favorite works of art & felt like I was seeing dear old friends-Renoir, Monet, Manet, Degas, Cassatt, Cezanne, Picasso, Van Gogh, Fragonard, da Vinci and more. They make me so happy & speak to my soul. Another wonderful museum is the Salvador Dali Museum in St Petersburg, Florida which houses the largest collection of Dali’s works outside of Spain. Not only are the paintings & sculptures fascinating but so is the building. Stanford University in Palo Alto, California has a wonderful collection of Rodin sculptures in a garden setting that is definitely worth checking out.

So get out there and appreciate the beautiful things in life! Tell me which are your favorites.

1. The Louvre in Paris

8.7 million visitors in 2015.

2. The National Museum of China in Beijing

7.3 million visitors in 2015.

3. National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

6.9 million visitors in 2015.

4. National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

6.9 million visitors in 2015.

5. British Museum in London

6.8 million visitors in 2015.

6. Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York

6.3 million visitors in 2015.

7. Vatican Museum

6 million visitors in 2015.

8. Shanghai Science and Technology Museum

5.9 million visitors in 2015.

9. National Gallery in London

5.9 million visitors in 2015.

10. National Palace Museum in Taiwan

5.3 million visitors in 2015.

 

Happy New Year     Feliz año nuevo     Bonne année 

Frohes neues Jahr      Feliz Ano Novo    Godt nytt år     Gëzuar Vitin e Ri 

 新年快         Gelukkig nieuwjaar      Ευτυχισμένο το νέο έτος   Tau Hou hari

Felice anno nuovo    Shona Bhliain Nua     明けましておめでとうございま

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New Year’s is the oldest holiday still being celebrated. The Babylonians celebrated the New Year as early as 4000 B.C. At that time, the New Year began on the first new moon after the Vernal Equinox. The celebration continued for eleven days, with each day having a different purpose and activity.

Some of the most widely used superstitions include the following: Kissing at midnight to ensure that the affections & relationships that we have made will continue for the next year. Filling up your refrigerator & pantries with food to ensure that you will have plenty of food throughout the next year. Putting money in every wallet in the house to ensure prosperity.  Also all of your bills should be paid before New Year’s Day to ensure that prosperity will be welcomed in your home but do not pay any bills on New Year’s Day or you will ensure a year of paying nothing but debts. You should not eat beef because cows mostly stand still. You should not eat poultry because they scratch backwards. Pigs, however, constantly root forward for food. So if you eat pork on New Year’s, you will be moving forward in a positive manner throughout the year. Wearing new clothes will increase your chances of receiving more clothes. Throughout the world the custom of making noise to ring in the New Year has not changed since ancient times as this is to scare off any evil spirits.

In Britain the custom of first footing is practiced. The first male visitor to the house after midnight brings good luck. Usually they bring a gift of money, bread, or coal, to ensure the family will have plenty of these things all the year to come. The first person must not be blond, red-haired or women as these people are supposedly bad luck. SO, I better not be the first person to cross your threshold, being a blonde woman!!

The Druids gave a gift of mistletoe, the sacred source of fertility. It would give you a fruitful year in the number of children, cattle and crops and thus wealth.

In Ireland the direction of the wind blowing at New Year would indicate the trend of politics in the coming year. If it blew from the west it would bring the Irish good luck, if from the east the English would have the luck. Also on New Year’s Eve if they ate a very large supper they would have plenty of food for the coming year.

In France dinner parties are thrown for the entire family customarily include special dishes like foie gras, oysters and champagne. They exchange kisses and wishes, saying, “Bonne Année”, Bonheur, Sante, Amour, Argent (“Good Year”, Happiness, Health, Love and Money).

In Germany people would drop molten lead into cold water to tell the future from the shape it made. A heart or ring shape meant a wedding, a ship a journey, and a pig plenty of food in the year ahead. People also would leave a bit of every food eaten on New Year’s Eve on their plate until after Midnight to ensure a filled pantry. Carp brings wealth. Traditionally jelly filled doughnuts with or without liquor fillings are eaten. Finally a tiny marzipan pig is eaten for more good luck. (Hmmm, eating a lot & eating pig seems to be a recurring theme.)

In Denmark they stand on chairs and then jump off them at midnight. Leaping into January is supposed to banish bad spirits and bring good luck.

January 1st is an important date in Greece because it is not only the first day of the New Year but it is also St. Basil’s Day. St Basil was one the founders of the Greek Orthodox Church, who was kind and generous to the poor. St Basil’s cake, baked with a silver or gold coin inside, is eaten. Whoever receives the coin will have good luck throughout the year. Pomegranates & grapes also bring good luck.

Italians call New Year’s Eve Capodanno (the “head of the year”). Traditionally, they wear red underwear.  A lentil stew is eaten when bell tolls midnight – one spoon per bell. This is supposed to bring good fortune; the lentils represent coins.

In Spain celebrations usually begin with a family dinner, including shrimp, lamb or capon. Wearing new, red underwear on New Year’s Eve brings good luck. It is traditional to eat twelve grapes, one on each chime of the clock, make a wish and then toast with sparkling wine such as cava or champagne. This tradition started in 1909, when grape growers in Alicante needed a way to get rid of the large surplus of grapes they had had that year.

In Puerto Rico and in parts of South America children enjoy throwing pails of water out the window at midnight. Some believe that this rids their home of any evil spirits.

In Bolivia families make beautiful little wood or straw dolls to hang outside their homes to bring good luck.

In Brazil the lentil is believed to signify wealth, so on the first day of the New Year they serve lentil soup or lentils and rice. The lentils are supposed to resemble coins. Grapes are also eaten. Brazilians traditionally dress in white, to bring good luck into the New Year.

Mexicans celebrate New Year’s Eve, Año Nuevo, by eating 1 grape while making a wish with each of the twelve chimes during the midnight countdown. Homes and parties are decorated with colors such as red, to improve lifestyle and love, yellow to improve employment conditions, green to improve finances and white to improve health. Mexican sweet bread is baked with a coin or charm hidden in the dough. When the bread is served, the recipient whose slice contains the coin or charm will have good luck in the New Year. Another tradition is to make a list of all the bad or unhappy events from the current year and before midnight throw it into a fire, symbolizing the removal of negative energy from the New Year.  At the same time, thanks are given for all the good things.

In Costa Rica in addition to eating the 12 grapes, they run across the streets with luggage asking for new trips and adventures in the upcoming year.

In Venezuela, many of the traditions are very similar to the ones from Spain. Those who want to find love in the New Year wear red underwear and yellow to have happiness.  If you want money, you must have a bill of high value when it is time to toast and if you want to travel, you must go out carrying some luggage.

In India people try to finish uncompleted work and pay off all debts before the end of the year. People buy new things for their homes or new clothes.  Animals are washed, groomed and decorated for the festival.

Chinese New Year is celebrated on the second new moon after the winter solstice. Firecrackers and noisemakers will chase away evil spirits. The fabulous dragon and lion will dance in the streets. People will wear red, the most auspicious of colors, and red envelopes with lucky money will be given to children. Tangerines are often given for good luck, but odd numbers are unlucky, so the tangerines are given in pairs.

It is traditional in Japan to spend a full week preparing for the New Year to arrive. The house must be thoroughly cleaned and all debts must be paid. All disagreements must be resolved and forgiven. Before midnight, 108 bells ring, to symbolize the elimination of 108 troubles. With no troubles, disagreements, debts, or disorder to contend with, all are free to welcome in the New Year with every expectation of peace and prosperity. The day after New Year’s is First Writing Day, when people write their hopes and dreams for the New Year.

Round shapes (representing coins) bring prosperity for the coming year in the Philippines. Families have large amounts of round fruits on the dining table and eat exactly 12 fruits at midnight (grapes). Some wear polka dots for luck.

In the USA black-eyed peas and rice called Hoppin’ John is eaten. An old saying goes, “Eat peas on New Year’s day to have plenty of everything the rest of the year.”  Most people toast with champagne at midnight. The dropping of the ball from the top of Times Square in New York City started in 1907.  The custom came from the time signal that used to be given at noon in harbors. New Year’s Eve is traditionally the busiest day of the year at Walt Disney World Resort in Florida and Disneyland in Anaheim, California.

Well, I need to go now and get my things in order to ensure that I have the best New Year ever.  I’m off to the store to buy some black-eyed peas, greens, lentils, grapes, and champagne. When I return I must make sure to put money in each wallet in the house. Then I will make sure to wear red, yellow, green and white. At the first stroke of midnight while jumping off a chair and holding a suitcase, I will be eating 12 grapes and making 12 wishes, hoping that I don’t choke or fall on my head. Yikes, I can’t forget the kisses! Wow, I certainly will be quite an interesting sight on New Year’s Eve. Ridiculous photos to follow, I’m sure. So Happy New Year to you all. I wish you happiness, good health, wealth and great friends to enjoy throughout the year!

Take a look at these great International  events happening this month for Realtors. Wonderful opportunities for learning & networking.

2015 International Conferences / Meetings & Events

MIPIM (Commercial Real Estate Expo)
Cannes, France
March 10 -13, 2015
http://www.mipim.com

This large commercial real estate expo attracts global investment real estate capital with over 16,000 attendees. NAR (National Association of Realtors) will have a booth at the show. Contact Jan Hope at NAR for more information.

Mar. 23–27

CIPS Institute, Sao Paulo, Brazil

CIPS (Certified International Property Specialist) Institute consisting of Global Real Estate: Local Markets, The Business of U.S. Real Estate, Asia/Pacific & International Real Estate, The Americas & International Real Estate, Europe & International Real Estate. Course is in English. Contact for additional information: silviacgama@gmail.com, chicopesserl@gmail.com

Canadian Real Estate Association’s AGM and Leadership Summit
Ottawa, Canada
March 28 29 2015
http://www.crea.ca

Annalisa Weller, Realtor®, Certified International Property Specialist

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 438 other followers

List of Categories

Monthly archive of my posts

RSS PROView-Pinellas Realtor Organization

  • Former member Dolores Wilson passed away July 2, 2019
    Dolores Wilson, age 77, of Pinellas Park, passed away on June 29, 2019 surrounded by family in her home. She was born to parents Kenneth and Mary Vigotty, and grew up in Long Island, New York with her two brothers, Michael and Kevin. She relocated to Pinellas County in 1974 with her husband, John Wilson, […]
    PROView
  • Association health plans – members opinions wanted June 12, 2019
    How do you feel about PRO/CPAR being able to offer association health insurance as part of your benefits package with us? Will you give us 3 minutes and take a survey about your current health insurance situation and your interest in PRO/CPAR offering you an association plan? If you take the survey, you’ll be entered […]
    PROView
  • 2019 Florida Legislature adjourns: Remote notaries, open permits & environment among victories May 6, 2019
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — May 4, 2019 — 2:16 pm — Your world got a little bit easier thanks to new legislation that brings modern technology and common sense to transactions. The Florida Legislature, which ended its 60-day legislative session minutes ago, passed two bills many Florida Realtors’ members had requested. One allows the use of […]
    PROView
  • UPDATE: PRO/CPAR and HCAR merger March 25, 2019
    Pinellas Realtor Organization/Central Pasco Chapter members voted to merge with Hernando County Association of Realtors (HCAR). Although HCAR’s Board of Directors was on board to offer the Plan of Merger to its membership for a vote, an HCAR member filed a lawsuit to block the vote. A court order was issued forbidding their members from […]
    PROView
  • New FREC Team Rules: Are You Compliant? March 5, 2019
    Florida Real Estate Commission (FREC) has approved a New Team Advertising Rule that will impact brokerage office procedures and team advertising. Brokers and teams have until July 1, 2019 to comply, but it’s not too early to prepare. Teams “Team or group advertising” shall mean a name or logo used by one or more real […]
    PROView

Visit Me at Active Rain