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As a festival that brings nearly 200,000 people to St. Pete every year, St. Pete Pride‘s commitment to No Straws St. Pete means a great deal. It’s just the latest in a number of impressive commitments to the movement which is growing, not only in St. Pete, but across Tampa Bay.

https://ilovetheburg.com/st-pete-pride-commits-to-no-straws-movement/

“How can we call ourselves St. Pete Pride without having pride in St. Pete,?” said St. Pete Pride board member, J. Aller. “For us as a board, it just made sense to align ourselves and the event with ‘No Straws St. Pete.’ We love our beautiful waterfront city and have a responsibility to help keep it pristine for years to come. Each beverage and food vendor was asked and strongly persuaded to refrain from freely giving straws to parade and festival goers. If a vendor agrees, they will be given a plaque to display their participation.”

The news comes on the heels of recent commitments by the newly opened Lucky’s Market as well as all three Hooters locations in St. Pete and follows the support of other major events including Run Fest St. Pete. While we’ve aimed to keep tabs on all of our partners, we’re learning new ones daily that have simply committed to the idea of making straws available only on request.

At a recent committee hearing at City Hall, councilwoman Wheeler-Bowman cited the movement’s impact on businesses saying she didn’t get a straw with her drink at a recent trip to Joey Brooklyn’s Pizza.

Pete Boland, owner of The Galley, commended the movement’s impact on the consumer saying guests are specifically requesting “no straw please” with their drinks.

As we have said all long, our partners are capable of educating the public simply by making the commitment. With thousands of people descending upon St. Pete for Pride, the impact of their commitment will be felt immediately.

That’s great news for our planet and the Burg, indeed.

https://ilovetheburg.com/st-pete-pride-commits-to-no-straws-movement/

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Cloudy view between Blind Pass & Devils Elbow, St Pete Beach, Florida. Love the view & the names!

Nice to come home & be greeted in the driveway by these lovely beauties. Two weeks of daily rain & sunshine has doubled the size of my hibiscus 🌺. After a super busy-long day, the sight of all of these flowers made me smile. I needed to stop & appreciate the bright colors on a such gray day. 😎

5 Best Caribbean Islands to Live in 2018 Revealed

Great article-some of my favorite Caribbean Islands made the list including St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Las Terrenas, Dominican Republic and Isla Mujeres, Mexico. Long ago when it was affordable, I lived on St John & St Thomas & I love it. Going on a trade mission the Dominican Republic in October 2018.

According to a new report from International Living, based on affordability, value, safety and lifestyle, these five islands made their list of the Top 5 Caribbean islands to live in 2018.

Vacation News » Miami Edition | By Monsef Rachid |2018  http://www.worldpropertyjournal.com/

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Ambergris Caye, Belize

Over the last few decades, expats have flocked to English-speaking Ambergris Caye, Belize, and there are good reasons for its popularity. (Among them the fact that in 2013 and 2014, TripAdvisor readers ranked Ambergris as the best island in the world.)

Ambergris and the small nearby islands are not overly developed, which means they’ve maintained a laidback vibe. Ambergris is Belize’s center for ocean sports during the day and for partying at night. In view of all this, it’s easy to understand why real estate prices have risen, especially for beachfront property.

Getting to Ambergris is easy because both of Belize’s domestic airlines–Tropic Air and Maya Island Air–have frequent flights to the island from Belize City. You can also reach Ambergris by water taxi.

San Pedro is the major population center on Ambergris, a town of roughly 18,000 part- and full-time residents. The once-sandy main streets are now paved. But golf carts are still expats’ favorite means of transportation from home to the beach, or to the dozens of restaurants, nightclubs, and friendly mom-and-pop stores.

Surprising to many, moving to Belize is easy–U.S. currency is accepted, credit cards are widely used and well-known U.S. brands are available too; they’re expensive, but substitutes are easy to find.

After years of 16-hour days as owners and operators of a Victorian B&B and cupcake shop in Richmond, Virginia, the easy-going lifestyle of San Pedro is just what Dawn Schick and her husband, Albert, were looking for.  And in 2010, they made the move.

“We’d been vacationing here several times a year for more than six years and decided this would be our eventual retirement home. But after years of hard work we thought, why wait until ‘someday,’? Why not take the plunge right now?” Dawn explains.

“We love being outdoors and the year-round warm weather lets us go snorkeling or paddle-boarding anytime we want. The marine life here is amazing. Swimming alongside rays, tropical fish, and turtles is like being in another world. We also love that it’s not touristy here.

“Life on the island moves at a slower pace, and that’s just fine with us.”

For between $2,700 and $2,900 per month, a couple can enjoy a comfortable retirement in Ambergris Caye–a budget that includes the cost of a house or apartment rental. If you own your own home on the island outright, then expats report it’s possible for a couple to live quite comfortably on less than $2,000 a month.

Roatán, Honduras

On the English-speaking Bay Island of Roatán, 30 miles off the coast of Honduras, you will find what is arguably the best-value island real estate in the region.

For less than $175,000, you could have a two-bedroom Caribbean home right on the water in a quiet neighborhood with no tourists–your own private getaway. If you stayed just part of the year, you could rent your place out to help cover your holding costs.

If you lived on Roatán, you’d have the sound of gentle waves and the rustle of palm fronds to wake you in the mornings. Looking out your window, you’d see clear, blue skies and the turquoise waters of the Caribbean. You could occupy yourself with a swim…enjoy a cup of coffee on your deck…or just sit back in your Adirondack chair, warm up in the sun, and take in the view of your own private stretch of beach…

On this tropical island, beachfront lots can be had for under $100,000. We’re talking established developments, with amenities like a community pool and/or shared or private docks. Utilities are in place. Construction costs are reasonable, and you can build a home to your specs.

There are also plenty of turnkey condos for well under $200,000–in resort communities on the beach. And if you’re okay with walking a few minutes to the water, or setting up on a hillside with views, you’ll pay even less for a lot, home, or condo.

This is an island where “normal” people can buy a vacation home or permanent digs to live out their sunny, low-cost, and comfortable retirement. The infrastructure is good and getting better all the time, with a new power plant online and the recent opening of a hospital with specialist care and a 24-hour emergency room.

It’s still out of the mainstream, at least compared to other Caribbean island getaways, and that has kept prices affordable for real estate and day-to-day costs. A couple could live well on $2,000 to $2,500–that includes all expenses.

And it’s simply a beautiful place to look at, thanks to the tall, jungle-covered mountains, white-sand beaches, and blue Caribbean (turquoise within the reef and a deep azure beyond it). Living here, you’ll have no shortage of things to do, with plenty of parties, sunset happy hours, water sports, and other fun.

Roatán boasts an international airport–with regular flights in and out it’s accessible and it’s quick and easy to see family back home.

“The one word that always comes to mind when asked how I like living here is ‘contentment,'” says Ann Winters of her retirement on Roatán. “I have never felt so content anywhere.”

Ann and her husband Ron have much to be content about. The couple are settled into a three-bedroom house set amid lush vegetation, overlooking the crystal-clear Caribbean Sea.

“I immediately loved the sounds and smells of Roatán,” says Ann of what drew her to the island. “The sound of the ocean soothes me. I love the smell of the salt on the breeze and the way the air smells so fresh after a rain. I love the cooking smells in the downtown mercado (market) and along the streets of West End, the scents coming from the open-air fruit and vegetable stands and the fish and meat markets. The flowers in my gardens that attract hummingbirds and butterflies.”

Isla Mujeres, Mexico

Legend has it that an ancient Maya Goddess of childbirth, identified Isla de Mujeres as a sacred place. The name Isla de Mujeres means Island of Women.

It was the Spaniards in the 16th century who decided that Island of Women would, therefore, be a fitting name for this tropical paradise where they noted hundreds of idols and carvings of women.

Today Isla Mujeres, eight miles off Cancún on Mexico’s Caribbean coast, is a retreat for tourists and retirees alike and offers easy living in the sun year-round.

You can own a one-bedroom, two-bathroom penthouse condo with a view from $230,000 or rent a one-bedroom place for $700 to $1000 a month, according to local expats.

When it was time to retire back in 2008, Lawrie Lock and his wife Lynda drove from their long-time home in Canada’s Okanagan Valley to Isla Mujeres.

“We live on the windward side of the island, facing the open ocean,” says Lynda. “That’s where all the action is. We often see pods of dolphins feeding just offshore and sea turtles basking right on the surface.

“We’d vacationed on the western side of Mexico for many years. But when we discovered the Caribbean side back in 2002…Wow! The turquoise and green water, fresh sea food, and the friendly islanders here on Isla Mujeres, along with the warm weather, were too much to resist.

“We have a large circle of friends. Some live here full-time and others come for the winter months. Winter is our busiest social time and summer is our wind-down, re-group time.”

The island enjoys a warm tropical climate (low to mid-80s F for most of the year) and a laidback vibe; golf carts are preferred to cars as the main means of transport.

Every winter, the permanent population of around 13,000 is joined by thousands of snowbirds fleeing colder weather up north. At four miles long and less than a half-mile wide, this tiny Caribbean island is connected to the mainland by high-speed ferry service that leaves every 30 minutes during daylight hours.

There is plenty to do on Isla Mujeres. Naturally, water activities top the list as the nearby reef offers amazing opportunities for scuba, fishing, swimming, boating, and snorkeling. There’s even an underwater museum set up by an English sculptor to explore, if the local sea life isn’t enough. And of course, there is the seasonal migration of whale sharks which draws many to view and swim with them.

Las Terrenas, Dominican Republic

Most Americans have never heard of the little beach town of Las Terrenas in the Dominican Republic’s northeast, on the Samana Penninsula. That’s understandable–it’s a spot better known among Europeans. But it offers one of the Caribbean’s best-value escapes today.

Here you’ll find 19 miles of public beaches, and palm trees swaying in the breeze. And compared to other Caribbean islands, property in this little corner of the D.R. is a roaring bargain.

French and Italian vacationers have been coming here for decades–vacationing and then coming back to stay. Along with the tang of saltwater in the air and the scent of fresh-cut coconuts, you’ll smell French bread and croissants baking. The Italian influence is strong, too, with rich Italian gelato on offer and strong, Italian-style coffee. There’s steak, sushi, and grilled seafood, too.

Las Terrenas has everything going for it that a Caribbean island escape should. It’s not overdeveloped–there are no mega-resorts here, just boutique hotels. It has great dining, stunning scenery at every point, and a vibrant expat community.

The most incredible thing about it, though, is the real estate prices. A one-bedroom, one-bathroom loft apartment can be had for as little as $99,500.

A couple can live in this tropical haven for around $2,000 a month, although most choose to spend closer to $3,000 a month.

When Dan Williams decided to retire there, he had been working for eight years as an environmental engineer for the Missouri state government. At the time, he was 57 years old, single, and longed to retire to the beach.

“The country is a mini-continent, with a wide variety of terrain, from oceans to the highest mountains in the Caribbean, and everything in between,” he says. “The climate is wonderful. It is close to the U.S. and is economical. Weighed in the balance, it is the ideal country for me.”

After a few months in Sosúa on the north coast of the Dominican Republic, Dan decided to tag along with a friend who was taking a road trip to Las Terrenas.

Dan was enchanted and decided to relocate there. “I loved the beach, the vibe, the natural beauty, and the European flavor of the place,” he says. “It seemed like a hidden Shangri-La.”

Corn Islands, Nicaragua

The Corn Islands are two little dots of paradise just 50 miles off Nicaragua’s Caribbean coast–a retirement nirvana with white sands, gently swaying palms and blue waters where English is the official language.

Big Corn–about four square miles in size and with maybe 6,000 inhabitants–is just 10 miles (or a 30-minute boat ride) from Little Corn, one-fourth the size of Big Corn in both land mass and population.

On Little Corn, there are no roads, just a three-foot-wide sandy walkway…so no vehicles allowed.

It’s a truly undiscovered, little-developed escape. Many say it’s like the Bahamas or Grand Cayman 30 or 40 years ago.

If you’re looking for a “throw-back” getaway, you won’t find a better one in the Caribbean. Here a custom-built home with an ocean view a 15-minute walk to town and beaches can be had for $150,000. And that’s fully furnished.

“With no vehicle traffic on Little Corn and lots of hotels, hostels and restaurants, it’s fun to walk around and see what there is to see,” says Bonnie Hayman, IL Nicaragua Correspondent. “This is the place where the tourists go.

“Big Corn is more adventurous with fewer tourists. Many hire a taxi to travel from one gorgeous beach to another sampling the wonderful “Islander” food like coconut bread and rondon (fish/seafood coconut stew). Either way, a fabulous time is to be had on the Caribbean side of Nicaragua.”

The Corn Islands aren’t for everyone. Supplies that aren’t locally grown or pulled from the waters must be shipped in. With small exception, restaurants tend to serve variations of the same dishes.

“The cost of food on the island is slightly higher than on the ‘main,’ as islanders call mainland Nicaragua,” says Mike Hopkins who lived on Big Corn while housesitting on the island. “However, in general, costs are still less than U.S. prices. Weekly, my food costs averaged about $30. I also ate at some local restaurants, where meals and a couple of drinks ranged between $15 and $20. My total food and drink cost for the three-month period was approximately $610.”

The islands have a rustic charm, perfect for those looking for an off-the-beaten-track retirement.  The healthy reef is ideal for scuba diving, snorkeling, fishing, and lobstering. With friendly locals and very few tourists an authentic island experience is ensured.

Two Islands not making the 2018 list

The beauty and tropical appeal of St. Thomas and Grand Bahama are impossible to deny. However, they can be costly.

“While we at International Living have nothing against St. Thomas or Grand Bahama–they’re thoroughly ‘discovered’ and that translates to more expensive,” says Jennifer Stevens, Executive Editor of International Living. “If money is no object, you might well like the polished escape either island can provide. But our list of 5 better-value picks in the Caribbean points you to lesser-known retreats where you’ll find a more laid-back vibe and lower costs.”

St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

Located in the Caribbean, the U.S. Virgin Islands is made up of over 60 islands–most of them uninhabited. The three most populated, and most visited, are St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix.

The appeal of these tropical islands is the mixture of the exotic and the recognizable–an island paradise with modern comforts and a balance of Caribbean culture and American practicality.

While St. Thomas may be a nice place to live, the International Living report says “avoid” due to the high cost of living. Apartments rent for about $2,000 a month and to buy a two-bedroom house in a good neighborhood will cost about $285,000-plus.

Grand Bahama Island, the Bahamas

The Bahamas is often thought of as a paradise–an upscale group of islands with some of the most beautiful beaches in the world.

And the Bahamas has many advantages–friendly to newcomers, there’s no foreign language to cope with, crime is relatively low, and the islands are positioned just off the Florida coast.

But the bad news is that properties aren’t cheap. Medium-sized residences in exclusive gated communities with ocean views often cost more than $2 million.

Grand Bahama is the closest major Bahamian island to the U.S.–about 55 miles off the Florida coast. It has become a haven for beach-lovers as well as divers, fishermen, golfers, and sports enthusiasts of all kinds. It’s also a prime destination for people who enjoy world-class shopping.

But living here costs a premium as it’s between 30% and 50% more expensive than in the U.S.

 

Enjoy the weekend on St Pete’s downtown waterfont


The 23rd Tampa Bay Blues Festival 

April 6-8, 2018 Friday and Saturday events start at 12:30pm and Sunday events start at 1pm on St Pete’s waterfront Vinoy Park – 701 Bay Shore Dr. NE 

Buy tickets starting at $40-online or CASH only at the gate: http://www.tampabaybluesfest.com/tickets.php

Friday’s line-up includes:

ROBERT CRAY 8:30 – 10:00 p.m.
BETH HART 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
JOHN NEMETH 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.
CHRIS BEARD 2:30 – 4:00 p.m.
JONN DEL TORO RICHARDSON 12:30 – 2:00 p.m.

Saturday’s line-up includes:

BUDDY GUY 8:30 – 10:00 p.m.
RONNIE EARL 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
JANIVA MAGNESS 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.
ERIC GALES 2:30 – 4:00 p.m.
QUINN SULLIVAN 12:30 – 2:00 p.m.

Sunday’s line-up includes:

DELBERT MCCLINTON 8:30 – 10:00 p.m.
SUGARAY RAYFORD 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
MISSISSIPPI HEAT 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.
BAND OF FRIENDS “A CELEBRATION OF RORY GALLAGHER FEAT. DAVY KNOWLES, GERRY MCAVOY, TED MCKENNA” 2:30 – 4:00 p.m.
TAD ROBINSON 1:00 – 2:15 p.m.
Artist and times subject to change

Hope you are all enjoying a wonderful holiday weekend with your families and friends!

May we all be filled with harmony, joy and love throughout the world.

 

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Some great things to do this weekend in beautiful, sunny, warm St Petersburg, Florida-enjoy!!

Friday, March 2nd, 2018

First Friday in downtown St Petersburg 
Tampa Bay Beer Week starts with First Friday with special craft beer tastings from Cycle, Crooked Thumb, Cigar City, Lagunitas, New Belgium, and Sierra Nevada. Get a taste of St. Patrick’s Day luck with Jameson’s special Cask Mates IPA! The Tempests will be playing.  5:30-10pm.  Central Ave Between 2nd & 3rd St.

The Soul Rebels return to the Witch Friday 3/2 for a free show
The Soul Rebels, an Eight piece brass ensemble from New Orleans, returns to the Witch for a very special concert on the First Friday of March. We will be kicking off the Tampa Bay Beer Week a day early with this show as we jump start the festivities in style Friday March 2nd. 9-11:30p.m. The Ale and the Witch 111 2nd Ave NE

Saturday, March 3rd

Saturday Morning Market Moves to Williams Park March 3; Closes For Grand Prix March 10 temporarily relocating to Williams Park, 350 2nd Ave. N., as the city finalizes preparations for the March 9-11 Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg. Williams Park is only four blocks from the Market’s regular location in the parking lot of Al Lang Stadium. Market hours are 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Market is held weekly on Saturdays from October through May from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

 


St. Petersburg Seafood & Music Festival – March 3-4 (Saturday and Sunday)
On the waterfront in downtown St. Petersburg-delicious fresh Florida seafood, drinks, and the sounds of some of Florida’s top artists and bands from both the local and regional circuit. General admission $7 at the gate, $5 in advance, with children under the age of 12 admitted free. Saturday 11 am-8 pm and Sunday 11 am-7 pm; Vinoy Park 701 Bay Shore Dr NE     For more information, including VIP admission rates,  go to http://www.paragonartevents.com/

St Pete Indie Market
90+ Vendors featuring artists and makers, vintage collectors, plants, handcrafted goods, small business, food and more! 11a.m.-4p.m.
Green Bench Brewing Co. 1133 Baum Ave N

6th Annual Awakening Into The Sun Wellness Festival
South Straub Park for a combination of health and wellness activities, spiritual connection, artisan vendors, healthy food, and fun in the sun at St. Petersburg’s beautiful waterfront 9a.m.
Starub Park- Downtown Waterfront Park 400 S Bayshore Dr

Flogging Molly
Irish-American seven-piece Celtic punk band from LA and led by Irish vocalist Dave King,  Jannus Live. 200 1st Ave N

Sunday, March 4th

Twinkle & Rock Soul Radio, St. Petersburg Seafood & Music Fest.
Foods and drinks with musical performances by local and regional musicians from jazz to rock, jazz, calypso, reggae and more. 1:30-3p.m. 701 Bay Shore Dr NE

Pinellas Park Civic Orchestra
Light classical, show tunes and pop  7:30-10p.m. Pinellas Park Performing Arts Center, 4951 78th Ave N

St. Pete’s largest “Community Celebration of All Things Local” showcasing nearly 200 of your favorite independent businesses and community organizations

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD, 2018 | 10 AM – 5 PM    (RAIN DATE: FEBRUARY 24TH)
WILLIAMS PARK | 330 2ND AVE N, 33701
A LIMITED AMOUNT OF ON-STREET PARKING IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT DOWNTOWN.
WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE PARKING GARAGES:
  • SUNDIAL ST. PETE GARAGE *ENTRANCE TO PARKING GARAGE IS AT 117 2ND STREET NORTH, 33701
  • NEW MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN ARTS AND CRAFTS MOVEMENT GARAGE – 350 3RD STREET NORTH, 33701
  • FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH | 212 3RD STREET NORTH, 33701 (ACROSS FROM WILLIAMS PARK) – THEIR PARKING LOT WILL BE AVAILABLE AT $10/CAR (CHURCH FUNDRAISER)

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Wine Weekend St. Pete
Enjoy some of the world’s most stellar wines during Wine Weekend St. Pete, benefitting the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg! The weekend will kick off on Friday in the museum with “Fetes a Versailles” for sponsors and VIPs. The masked balls of Louis XV will be brought back to life and a five-star dinner of French cuisine will be served. The International Wine Auction will follow on Saturday with an after party where you can enjoy fine wines, hors-d’oeuvres, and music. The weekend will conclude with “Le Champagne Brunch” on Sunday at 11 am. A wide variety of champagne, international culinary delights, and live music will be featured, toasting Wine Weekend 2018 and the Museum.

Clear blue waters and long stretches of sand have always been the appeal of St. Petersburg, Fla. But these days, visitors are just as likely to dive into the Tampa Bay town’s vibrant arts and culture scene.

Over the last decade, the Sunshine City has evolved into a creative hub, with world-class museums, thriving galleries and bold street art that have the once-neglected downtown booming again. And soon there will be much more to admire: Three ambitious new museums will open in St. Pete over the next two years, cementing its reputation as one of Florida’s cultural hot spots.

Here’s how a short trip to the ’Burg should look:

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A hot glass demo at the Duncan McClellan Gallery.

After a blissed-out day at the beach, head into town for a late-afternoon stroll through the dazzling collection of glass sculptures crafted by Dale Chihuly at the Chihuly Collection. Stock up on colorful wares at its gift shop, then hit nearby Intermezzo Coffee & Cocktails for oysters and craft cocktails.

In the mood for something sweet? Grab a gourmet ice pop at The Hyppo, which boasts a staggering array of flavors from pumpkin cheesescake to pineapple cilantro. After the sun sets, savor a fresh catch at one of St. Pete’s fine restaurants; you can’t go wrong with the olive oil-seared grouper at FarmTable Cucina ($30). After dessert, shuffle on over to the historic St. Petersburg Shuffleboard Club— known as the world’s largest club for the sport — for a few late-night matches.

Thanks to St. Pete’s laid-back yet imaginative spirit, there’s more art to check out the next day. More than 80 — and counting — eye-catching outdoor murals wrap buildings, walls and a main downtown intersection. “They create a sense of community,” says Derek Donnelly, a local talent behind a number of works. “I credit the art with helping turn around St. Pete.”

Donnelly helps promote the annual Shine St. Petersburg Mural Festival, which wrapped its third iteration last month and is gearing up the next one in the fall of 2018. Local, national and international street artists from as far away as Australia gather to create large-scale, open-air works over 10 days.

According to Donnelly, the best place to start a mural tour is the alley behind the stores on the 600 North block of downtown’s Central Avenue. The lane is so jammed with trippy wall tattoos — including several of his compositions featuring dinosaur and sea creature — that even the dumpsters are decorated.

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The Dali MuseumDana Hoff

Don’t forget a visit to St. Pete’s popular Dali Museum, ($24 for adults), which houses the largest collection of works by the mustachioed genius outside his native Spain. On a smaller scale, more than 75 galleries dot the town’s seven arts districts. In the Warehouse Arts District, don’t miss the astounding glass works at Duncan McClellan Gallery — or its romantic sculpture garden, or its hot shop demonstrations by a team of artists.

Best of all, St. Pete has much more creative capital in the pipeline.

The first outpost — the Imagine Museum, which centers on glass art — opens its doors in January. A repurposed school will exhibit pieces from 55 renowned glass artists, including Harvey Littleton and Marlene Rose.

The James Museum of Western & Wildlife Art will also debut early next year. Occupying most of a city block, it will showcase works in oil, ink, stone and steel — evoking the frontier spirit and celebrating life in the wild. The works were collected over decades by Tom James, chairman emeritus of investment company Raymond James, and his wife Mary.

The biggest passion project of all is downtown’s $70 million Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement, scheduled to open in spring 2019. The monumental building, designed by Cuban-born local architect Alberto Alfonso, is being purpose-built to display businessman Rudy Ciccarello’s extensive decorative arts collection.

With so much art on tap — as well as year-round sunshine and those irresistible white-sand beaches — it’s worth adding St. Pete to your vacation short list.

Where to eat and sleep

From landmark hotels to catch-of-the-day restaurants, St. Petersburg has the hospitality waterfront covered. Here’s a look at some local favorites:

  • Hotels
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Base yourself at Wyndham Grand Clearwater Beach.HP

Active much? Take your pick of four sports at the historic Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club, which features 18 holes, tennis courts, a private 74-slip marina and two pools (from $264).

For a chic sleep, book a reservation at the 18-room Birchwood Inn. You can’t beat the elegant rooms with four-poster beds — or the spectacular rooftop lounge (from $310).

The Wyndham Grand Clearwater Beach is about 40 minutes outside of downtown St. Pete but mere seconds from a spectacular beach. (Clearwater Beach, in fact, was rated the best in the country by TripAdvisor last year.) With a pool and a spa onsite, it’s easy to unwind here (from $174).

  • Food
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The Reading Room’s stylish staff.Partho

Cool and creative, the Reading Room serves delicious garden-inspired and wood-fired fare. Many of the herbs and vegetables are grown in the beds outside.

The seafood-centric menu changes daily at swanky Sea Salt, but the dishes are always fresh and succulent. Don’t miss the happy hour.

Sunday, December 3rd, the moon will seem larger and brighter than it has all year.  A “super moon” apparently happens when the moon is full and is at the same time the closest to the Earth during its orbit so it seems brighter than usual.

The Super Moon will be here on December 3rd and is also call a “Full Cold Moon” as it is  the first full moon of December or winter. It should shine approximately 16 percent brighter and 7 percent larger than normal, according to National Geographic. Then we will have a full moon on January 2 and then again on January 31. So we will have a BLUE moon in January. A BLUE moon is when a full moon occurs twice in the same month, which is pretty rare. Usually, we have 12 full months per year but 2018 will have 14 full moons-the other will be March 31st. How cool is that?

Astronomers say that the best time to see the Super moon is in the early evening just as the moon is rising and in the early morning as it is setting. You can guess when I will be looking at the Super Moon.

 

Other moons have special names that have been around for thousands of years, each name reflects what time of year it is:

January is Wolf Moon is named after the sound of hungry wolves. Native Americans and medieval Europeans would recognize their howls as a sign of midwinter. So January 3rd will be a Wolf Super Moon & January 31st will be a Blue Super Moon. Awesome!

February is the Snow Moon. Obvious.  

April is the Pink Moon.  Northern Native Americans called it this because of the early blooming wildflowers. Nice.

September is the Harvest Moon-traditional time for gathering of crops.

November is the Beaver Moon. Algonquin tribes set beaver traps for the winter fur supply & keeping warm.

Annalisa Weller, Realtor®, Certified International Property Specialist

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    We received a call from a Realtor member who shared her experience with wire fraud attempt. She received four offers on a property. Someone hacked into her email and was sending emails from it, acting as her, with very suspicious language. Three contracts were sent to her with requests to wire tens of thousands of […]
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  • Florida has a new team advertising rule June 25, 2018
    The team ad regulation, 61J2-10.026 Team or Group Advertising, is as follows: 61J2-10.026 Team or Group Advertising. (1) “Team or group advertising” shall mean a name or logo used by one or more real estate licensees who represent themselves to the public as a team or group. The team or group must perform licensed activities […]
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  • May 2018 Pinellas County Real Estate Statistics June 21, 2018
      Click here to view Pinellas County Real Estate Statistics for May 2018 to see what the numbers tell us about the market.
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  • PRO COO Katie Shotts goes to Hernando County Association of REALTORS as CEO June 18, 2018
    PRO Chief Operating Officer Katie Shotts, RCE, e-PRO was selected as the next Hernando County Association of REALTORS CEO. Katie has ten years of experience in the REALTOR family, including 7 years at the 3,200-member Memphis Area Association of REALTORS and 3 years at PRO. She was the Communications Director and staff exec for the […]
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