You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Tax Credits’ category.

 

Displaying

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – 2016 – The runaway winner in the primary election was at the end of the ballot, as voters in Florida overwhelmingly approved a tax break to encourage businesses to go solar.

The amendment, which will become part of the Florida Constitution, exempts solar and other renewable energy devices on business and industrial property from property taxes for 20 years. The same tax break already exists for residential property owners.

The amendment also exempts renewable energy devices from Florida’s tangible personal property tax.

Amendment 4, the only ballot question in Tuesday’s primary, won more than 70 percent of the vote, according to early returns by the Florida Division of Elections.

Backers of Amendment 4 were all along the political spectrum, including the pro-environment Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Nature Conservancy and Florida Conservation Voters, and the business-backed Florida Chamber of Commerce, Florida Retail Federation and Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association.

Business groups like tax relief, and environmental groups hope it will now encourage more talk in the conservative state Capitol about climate change and the need to cut dependency on fossil fuels.

“With all of this sunshine, why are we importing so much fossil fuel to power our state?” asked Pete Wilking of A1A Solar in Jacksonville.

“Stop sea levels from rising! Vote Yes on 4!” tweeted an advocacy group, Women4Solar.

The opposition was led by the Rev. Al Sharpton, the TV and radio talk show host and president of the National Action Network (NAN), and Bishop Victor Curry of Miami, NAN’s southeast regional director, who said they opposed “unnecessary and unjust tax breaks for corporations.”

It was one of the most cost-effective referendum campaigns in Florida history, as supporters raised less than $150,000.

Lacking the money for a TV ad campaign, supporters built support networks on Facebook and Twitter (hashtag #Yeson4) to mobilize voters.

Voters said yes to solar, even if they did not always fully understand it.

The vote of the people was just one step, however. The Legislature, which put Amendment 4 on the ballot, must pass a bill in the next session in 2017 carrying out the will of the voters.

At the same time, a much more potent political battle over solar will play out on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.

Known as Amendment 1, the ballot question is an effort by utility companies that would prohibit the sale of solar energy to individual customers and, critics say, would add new regulatory barriers to solar expansion in Florida.

Supporters, calling themselves Consumers for Smart Solar, have raised $19.1 million so far.

Florida Power & Light, Gulf Power, TECO Energy and Duke Energy are among Amendment 1’s biggest backers and environmental groups are working to defeat it.

Utilities prevailed on state lawmakers to put Amendment 4 on the primary ballot to avoid confusing voters about their higher priority, Amendment 1.

Susan Glickman of Southern Alliance for Clean Energy said moving Amendment 4 to a low-turnout primary was a blessing in disguise, as it turned out.

“It’s a little bit easier because it’s a more informed electorate,” Glickman said.

Copyright © 2016 Miami Herald, Steve Bousquet. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Miami Herald writer Alex Daugherty contributed to this report.

 

Florida Realtors has announced its support for Amendment 4, a measure on the Aug. 30 primary ballot that would extend a tax break for solar devices on homes to businesses and industrial facilities.

by Lloyd Dunkelberger  July 2016 http://saintpetersblog.com/florida-realtors-announce-support-amendment-extend-tax-break-solar-devices/

The amendment, sponsored by Sen Jeff Brandes and Rep. Ray Rodrigues in the 2016 session, would exempt solar units from both property taxes and tangible personal property taxes on commercial properties.

“It will encourage Florida’s business community to invest in solar, which will expand the use of clean energy and help reduce our reliance on fossil fuels,” said Matey Veissi, the Realtors president and  co-owner of Veissi & Associates in Miami.

“In turn, increased solar energy will help preserve our natural environment for future generations. As the Sunshine State, Florida should be in the forefront of solar choice for businesses and consumers,” Veissi said.

Dean Asher, a former Realtors president and candidate for Senate District 13, said passage of the amendment could expand employment opportunities in a solar industry that already employs 6,000 workers.

“If Amendment 4 passes, it could increase the number of jobs across the state as more business owners install solar panels at their properties,” he said. “Removing tax penalties and making solar and other renewable energy options more affordable in Florida will spark more interest in using solar energy – and that benefits both residents and business owners across Florida.”

If passed by 60 percent of the votes and then implemented by the Legislature, the tax incentives of the amendment will begin in 2018 and extend for 20 years.

A recent Florida Chamber of Commerce poll showed 64 percent of voters in favor of the measure, with 19 percent opposed and 17 percent undecided.

The Realtors, who have 155,000 members in Florida, join a large contingent of Amendment 4 supporters, including the Florida Retail Federation, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, the Solar Energy Industry Association, The Nature Conservancy and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy.

 

by Lloyd Dunkelberger  July 2016 http://saintpetersblog.com/florida-realtors-announce-support-amendment-extend-tax-break-solar-devices/

There are three dominant trends in real estate that sellers should be aware of going into the new year. CNNMoney recently asked industry insiders to share what will be important when it comes to selling a home in 2016. Do you agree?

  1. A seller’s market dominates. Home prices have been climbing so much that they’re even matching their 2006 highs. Seller’s markets are more dominant in certain cities such as San Francisco, where bidding wars are widely reported and offers go well above asking price. “The more lucrative a region’s economic future appears to be, the easier you can expect it to be to sell a home,” according to the article.
  2. Mortgages will get pricier. Low mortgage rates have been the standard in the last few years, but that will soon change. The Federal Reserve is gradually beginning to raise rates, which will move mortgage rates higher and dampen affordability. Sellers should be aware that it may become more difficult for prospective buyers to secure financing.
  3. Tax benefits still abound. The largest tax break for ordinary taxpayers who qualify remains the exclusion on capital gains for the sale of personal residences. Single taxpayers are able to exclude a maximum of $250,000 in gains from the sale of a home. Joint filers get double that: $500,000.

Source: “Selling a Home in 2016? Here’s What You Need to Know,” CNNMoney/Motley Fool

This is a great article to read if you are thinking about purchasing a second home, an investment property or a retirement home in another country.

 

House with an ocean view in the Dominican Republic

iStock Photo

David McKeegan, co-founder of Greenback Expat Tax Services, weighs in on the issues U.S. expats should consider when buying and selling foreign property.

Whether American expats are looking to buy overseas property as an investment, vacation home, rental or residence, taxes should always be top of mind.  Regardless of the potential return on investment, beauty, or the property’s fit into your expat lifestyle dream, consider these tax do’s & don’ts to ensure your purchase is one you don’t regret.

Do consider setting up a Limited Liability Company (LLC) to purchase the property
As a U.S. expat, if you are purchasing a foreign property primarily for investment purposes (either in your expat country or elsewhere outside of the U.S.), doing so as an individual may be the easiest but not the most advantageous decision. While tax time will be less complex (simply reporting rental income/expenses on your 1040), individual ownership offers you no liability protection. For LLCs with only one owner, the LLC is considered a “disregarded entity” for tax purposes, and all of the activity will be reported on the individual’s personal U.S. tax return.  This eliminates the burden of filing separate business tax returns and avoids the increased accounting fees associated with a business tax return.

Don’t ignore foreign-exchange rates
When you purchase a foreign property, you will likely transfer a large sum of money into your foreign bank account for the initial down payment.  Before you do, find out the foreign-exchange rates and fees associated with the transfer and even seek a professional broker who can ensure you obtain the most beneficial exchange rate possible—this could save you thousands of dollars when you buy and can impact your profit when you sell.

Remember that the U.S. may tax you on any resulting gains when you sell your property. The exchange rate gain from paying off a mortgage is calculated by converting the amount of the loan to USD using the exchange rate at the time the loan was originated and the exchange rate at the time the loan was paid off. The resulting gain is taxable as ordinary income using your marginal U.S. tax rate. If you have held the property for more than a year, however, you’ll be taxed at the long-term capital gains rate of 0%, 10% or 20%, depending on your marginal U.S. tax bracket.

Do deduct your mortgage interest and points from your U.S. Federal Tax Return filing
Mortgage interest and points are deductible on your U.S. expat tax return, even though the property is in a foreign country.  But the deduction can only be taken against income that has not been excluded by the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion. So if you exclude all your foreign income, you’ll need to have U.S.-sourced income or non-excluded foreign income to use this deduction.

Don’t forget to reduce gains taxes with the Foreign Tax Credit
The gain on your foreign property sale may be taxed by the country in which the property is located, as well as the U.S. For U.S. tax purposes, this gain is considered foreign-sourced income, so you may be able to use the Foreign Tax Credit to reduce your resulting U.S. tax liability. However, the gain isn’t considered foreign earned income, so it cannot be excluded using the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion.

Do try to keep the home for 2-5 years
As a U.S. expat living the life of a digital nomad or bouncing around for your career, planning to live in a residence for 2 or more years may not be possible. But regardless, try not to sell for at least two years.  The reason is that when you live in the home for 2-5 years, you will be eligible to exclude a gain of up to $250,000 (or $500,000 for those filing married jointly) from U.S. taxation. If not, the full gain will be taxed at the applicable capital gains rates.

 

David McKeegan is Co-Founder of Greenback Expat Tax Services, which specializes in the expert preparation of U.S. federal tax returns for Americans living abroad.

Email us at expat@wsj.com. Follow us @WSJexpat. Join our Facebook group.

I recently read several articles on buyers and what they think is important when purchasing a home. Most consider energy efficiency as an important factor, especially  with those who are 40 and under.

Here a few things that you can do if you plan on selling or staying put that will help with your energy bill & the environment. Some are easy and inexpensive to implement, while others take more time and money. When buyers see 2 homes that are similar, energy efficiency just may just tip the scales in your favor.

1. Set up an appointment with a Home Energy Auditor. Start with contacting your utility company because many will do an free audit. I do this every time I move & then a few years later. They point out where you are loosing heat or cool air via windows, doors, attic, fire places, etc. and if you need to replace heating/air conditioning systems (HVAC), appliances or water heaters.

2. Have your HVAC systems serviced twice a year and ask them to check its efficiency and when it might need replacing.

3. Replace your appliances with energy-efficient appliances. This will help your monthly energy bill and may be very attractive to  future buyer.  For more info visit  www.energystar.gov.

4. Think about buying a tank less water heater.  In Europe these have been in use for many years. When I was a kid in Germany, we had one & that’s long time ago!! You can save a great deal.

5. Install ceiling fans. They can help reduce your energy bill both in summer & winter. I keep my fans on year round.  Installing one at the top of the stairs helps too.

6. Replace or add insulation and make sure that it is at recommended numbers or higher for your area. It will be mentioned in your audit.

7. Think about replacing your windows with double pane. It does cost a lot, which is why I put this at the end of this list. Maybe do some of them at a time or see if your window installer will set up an interest free payment plan. I know that Home Depot & Lowes do this from time to time. Also check with IRS for possible tax credits.

By the way, I have used these and other energy & water saving items for many years. I also have my GREEN (Environmental Real Estate designation) from the National Association of Realtors.

Late last night the U.S. House of Representatives voted 257-167 to pass the U.S. Senate’s plan to avert the ‘fiscal cliff.’ President Obama has said he will sign the bill into law. Congress agreed that current tax rates will stay the same for households that make less than $450,000 annually, and $400,000 annually for individual filers. This coupled with the fact that there will be no change to capital gains taxes, the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) believes there will be no change financially for the vast majority of home buyers and sellers.

Here are few key issues that affect REALTORS®, home buyers and sellers.

  1. Congress excluded a capital gains tax increase for sale of a principle residence of up to $500,000 ($250,000 for individuals). The tax rate on capital gains would also remain the same, at 15 percent, for most households, but for those earning above the $400,000-$450,000 threshold, the rate would rise to 20 percent.
  2.  The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 was extended. This provides relief to troubled borrowers when some portion of mortgage debt is forgiven. This averts the crisis many short sales were facing with the New Year. The mortgage cancellation relief extension is for one year.
  3. Congress extended deductions for mortgage insurance premiums, state property taxes, and local property taxes. The limitation is that he write-off is available only to borrowers who have an adjusted gross income below $110,000.
  4. The mortgage interest deduction was left untouched, continuing tax relief for homeowners.
  5. Tax credits for energy-efficiency home improvements. This provides tax credits of $200 to $500 for owners who install energy-efficient windows, insulation and other upgrades designed to cut energy consumption in 2012 and 2013.
  6. Tax credits for new energy-efficient new houses. This allows builders and contractors to claim a $2,000 tax credit on new homes constructed in 2012 and 2013 that meet federally specified energy-conservation standards. The bill also extends credits for U.S.-based manufacturers of energy-efficient refrigerators, clothes washers and dishwashers. As with other energy-related tax provisions, this had expired last year and will now be continued through 2013.

Not all aspects of the fiscal cliff have been dealt with, and come February Congress will be required to re-engage the issue to deal with the national debt ceiling and required federal budget cuts.

All in all, it’s not too bad.

Real Estate Tax Talk   By Stephen Fishman Inman News®

Over the  past several years, millions of homeowners have had billions of dollars in  mortgage debt forgiven, either through foreclosure, refinancing or short sales.  It’s important for real estate professionals and homeowners to understand that  mortgage debt forgiveness has significant tax consequences.

Here are 10  things the Internal Revenue Service says you should know about mortgage debt  forgiveness:

1.  Normally, when a lender forgives a debt — that is, relieves the borrower from  having to pay it back — the amount of the debt is taxable income to the  borrower. Thus, a homeowner who had $100,000 in mortgage debt forgiven through  a short sale would have to pay income tax on that $100,000, as an example.

Fortunately,  under the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007, you may be able to  exclude from your taxable income up to $2 million of debt forgiven on your  principal residence from 2007 through 2012. This means you don’t have to pay  income tax on the forgiven debt.

2. The  limit is $1 million for a married person filing a separate return.

3. You may  exclude from your taxable income debt reduced through mortgage restructuring,  as well as mortgage debt forgiven in a foreclosure.

4. To  qualify, the debt must have been used to buy, build or substantially improve  your principal residence and be secured by that residence.

5. The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act applies to home improvement  mortgages you take out to substantially improve your principal residence — that  is, they also qualify for the exclusion.

6. Second  or third mortgages you used for purposes other than home improvement — for  example, to pay off credit card debt — do not qualify for the exclusion.

7. If you  qualify, claim the special exclusion by filling out Form 982: Reduction of  Tax Attributes Due to Discharge of Indebtedness ,  and attach it to your federal income tax return for the tax year in which the  debt was forgiven.

8. Debt  forgiven on second homes, rental property, business property, credit cards or  car loans does not qualify for the tax-relief provision. In some cases,  however, other tax-relief provisions — such as bankruptcy — may be  applicable. IRS Form 982 provides more details about these provisions.

9. If your  debt is reduced or eliminated, you normally will receive a year-end statement,  Form 1099-C: Cancellation of Debt, from your lender. By law, this form must  show the amount of debt forgiven and the fair market value of any property  foreclosed.

10. Examine  the Form 1099-C carefully. Notify the lender immediately if any of the  information shown is incorrect. You should pay particular attention to the  amount of debt forgiven in Box 2  as well as the value listed for your home in Box    7.

The IRS has  created a highly useful Interactive Tax Assistant on its website that you can use to  determine if your canceled debt is taxable. The tax assistant tool takes you  through a series of questions and provides you with responses to tax law  questions.

For more  information about the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007, see IRS  Publication 4681: Canceled Debts, Foreclosures, Repossessions and Abandonments.  You can get it from the IRS website at irs.gov.

Stephen Fishman is a tax expert, attorney and author who has published 18 books, including “Working for Yourself: Law & Taxes for Contractors,  Freelancers and Consultants,” “Deduct  It,” “Working as an Independent Contractor,” and  “Working with Independent Contractors.” He  welcomes your questions for this weekly column

Real Estate Tax Talk   By Stephen Fishman
Q: How can real estate agents be a resource for buyers on tax issues, such as the tax benefits of buying vs. renting?

A: Unless a real estate broker or agent is a bona fide tax professional — for example, has an MBA or other specialized training in taxation — he or she should not give clients detailed tax advice. As a real estate professional, you are licensed to help your clients buy real estate — not serve as their professional tax adviser.

If you give tax advice and it turns out to be wrong, it could cost the client a bundle of money, and leave you with a lawsuit for malpractice.

If a client does ask you for tax advice, and you give it, a good practice is to have the client sign a statement providing that he or she has not relied on your advice and that the transaction is contingent on the approval of the client’s tax or legal counsel.

That said, the tax benefits of real estate ownership are something every buyer should understand. You need to understand them as well.

When it comes to the tax benefits of renting vs. buying, the benefits of buying are many, while there are few or no tax benefits for renting. This simple fact can help get renters motivated to take the plunge into homeownership.

The tax benefits of buying a home include:

Home mortgage interest deduction: The interest paid on a mortgage or mortgages of up to $1 million for a principal residence and/or second home is deductible as an itemized deduction. In the early years of a home loan most of the payments consist of interest, so this deduction is particularly substantial during the first years of homeownership.

Depending on the state a buyer lives in and his or her tax bracket, this deduction can reduce the cost of borrowing by one-third or more.

Home equity loan deduction: Homeowners can borrow up to $100,000 against the equity in their home and deduct the interest as an itemized deduction. The money can be used for any purpose, such as paying off high-interest credit card debt. In contract, the interest on credit card debt is not deductible.

Property tax deduction: Homeowners also get to deduct from their federal income taxes the state and local property taxes they pay on their home. This is another itemized deduction that renters don’t get.

Deductible homebuying expenses: Various closing costs ordinarily involved in a home purchase are also deductible as itemized deductions, including loan origination fees (points), prorated interest on a new loan, and prorated property taxes paid at settlement.

$250,000/$500,000 home-sale exclusion: Perhaps the greatest tax benefit of owning a home comes when a person sells it at a profit. Homeowners who lived in their home for two of the prior five years prior to its sale need pay no income tax on a substantial amount of their profit — $250,000 for single homeowners and $500,000 for married homeowners who file jointly. This exclusion can be used once every 24 months.

14 days of free rental income: Another little known tax benefit of owning a home is that the owner can rent it out for up to 14 days during the year and pay no tax at all on the rental income. In contrast, a renter who sublets his or her rental must pay income tax on all the rental income he or she earns.

Tax benefits of renting:

The only tax benefit that a renter can qualify for by virtue of being a renter is the home office deduction. This is a business deduction available to renters who own a business and have a home office they use regularly and exclusively for business purposes.

Some employees can qualify for this deduction as well. The deduction is limited to the amount of profit earned from the business each year. If a renter pays a lot of rent, this deduction can be substantial. Homeowners who are in business and have a home office can also qualify for the deduction.

Of course, the value of the tax benefits of buying a home depends on the state the buyer lives in and his or her tax bracket. Buyers who live in high tax states like New York or California get the most benefit.

This is why the blanket statement “it’s always better to buy than rent” is not always true. It all depends on the buyer’s individual circumstances.

You should encourage prospective buyers to run the numbers. There are some excellent websites you can refer clients to that have online calculators they can use to compare the costs of renting vs. buying a home.

A good rent vs. buy tool can be found on the Smart Money Magazine website: http://www.smartmoney.com/personal-finance/real-estate/to-rent-or-to-buy-9687/.

Freddie Mac also has a good online calculator: http://www.freddiemac.com/corporate/buyown/english/calcs_tools/.

Stephen Fishman is a tax expert, attorney and author who has published 18 books, including “Working for Yourself: Law & Taxes for Contractors, Freelancers and Consultants,” “Deduct It,” “Working as an Independent Contractor,” and “Working with Independent Contractors.” He welcomes your questions for this weekly column.

RISMEDIA, December 23, 2010—An extension of the Bush tax cuts gives Americans more options as they do year-end tax planning. Specifically, the bill extended the charitable IRA contribution and state and local sales tax deduction for 2010. Because the tax rates are extended, deferring compensation is an option for taxpayers who have that flexibility.

The choice of estate tax method is new. The bill extends earlier provisions for energy credits and extends the American Opportunity Credit. Edward Karl, vice president of taxation for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and other members of the AICPA tax staff suggest taxpayers consider the tax saving ideas below to cut their tax bills.

Top Off Retirement Accounts
Taxpayers can boost their retirement savings in a tax-efficient manner by contributing up to $5,000 to an Individual Retirement Account or Roth IRA if they are under 50 or $6,000 if they are 50 or older.

Claim the Saver’s Credit
Lower-income taxpayers should remember to take the Saver’s Credit for contributions they made to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as a 401(k) plan, or individual retirement vehicles, such as a traditional or Roth IRA. Taxpayers get a credit for up to half of what they contribute, although the maximum credit is $1,000 or $2,000 for couples.

Convert a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA
Taxpayers who convert a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA in 2010 do not have to pay the tax due on the conversion in 2010. They can decide in 2011 if they want to defer 50 percent of the income to 2011 and 50 percent to 2012. While taxpayers can delay the payment decision as late as Oct. 15, 2011, they have to pay the tax when their taxes are due in April 2011.

Contribute to Charities Tax Free
The new law allows taxpayers who are 70½ or older to make contributions to charitable organizations directly from IRAs without paying tax on the amount contributed from the IRA. Taxpayers can make these contributions during January of 2011 and have them apply to their 2010 taxes. Each taxpayer can contribute up to $100,000 for 2010 and 2011. Contributions for 2010 can be made until the due date of the 2010 return, which is April 18 for most taxpayers filing federal tax returns.

Offset Education Costs
Among the tax rules that taxpayers can use to offset 2010 education costs are the following:

• The American Opportunity Credit offers eligible taxpayers up to $2,500 per student for qualifying 2010 tuition and expenses, including books and computer equipment. The American Opportunity Credit can be used by students for the first four years of post-secondary education expenses. Importantly, taxpayers who pay no taxes may qualify for a refund of up to $1,000. The new tax law extends the American Opportunity Credit through 2012.

• An “above-the-line” deduction offers eligible taxpayers as much as $2,500 for interest paid on student loans, even if they don’t itemize deductions. The new tax law extends this deduction and increases the phase-out range.

• Section 529 college savings plans give parents, grandparents and others a way to contribute after-tax dollars in order to have earnings and interest accumulate free of federal, and in some cases, state taxes. No federal income taxes are paid on withdrawals from the accounts.

Take Tax Credits for Energy-Efficient Home Improvements
Homeowners who installed certain energy-efficient heating and air conditioning systems, water heaters, doors and windows, insulation and roofs are eligible to receive a credit to help reduce the costs. Taxpayers who did not take advantage of the credit in 2010 have an opportunity to do so in 2011, under the new tax law. A credit is available for homeowners who invest in green energy equipment, too. Such equipment includes solar electric systems, solar hot water heaters, geothermal heat pumps and wind turbines.

Consider Deducting State and Local Sales Taxes
Taxpayers can choose to take an itemized deduction for state and local general sales taxes on their 2010 taxes instead of the itemized deduction for state and local income taxes.

Taking a deduction for sales taxes can mean a lower tax bill for taxpayers who make such a major purchase as a motor vehicle during the year or who live in states that do not have an income tax. The new tax law extends this option through 2011.

Choose Best Estate Tax Method
Taxpayers, who inherited property in 2010 when no estate tax applies, get nine months under the new tax law to choose whether to use the new estate tax rules (35 percent top rate and $5 million exemption) or no estate tax with the estate’s assets generally being subject to the carryover basis rules. Carryover basis rules result in a transfer of the decedent’s adjusted basis (typically, the owner’s original purchase price) to the beneficiaries. Historically, the basis of an estate’s assets have been established using stepped-up basis rules, which consider basis to be the fair market value of the assets at the time of the owner’s death.

Defer Compensation
Since tax rates will remain at current levels for the next two years, taxpayers may want to consider deferring payments into 2011 from such compensation sources as pensions, retirement plans and stock options.

Annalisa Weller, Realtor®, Certified International Property Specialist

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 438 other followers

List of Categories

Monthly archive of my posts

RSS PROView-Pinellas Realtor Organization

  • Former member Dolores Wilson passed away July 2, 2019
    Dolores Wilson, age 77, of Pinellas Park, passed away on June 29, 2019 surrounded by family in her home. She was born to parents Kenneth and Mary Vigotty, and grew up in Long Island, New York with her two brothers, Michael and Kevin. She relocated to Pinellas County in 1974 with her husband, John Wilson, […]
    PROView
  • Association health plans – members opinions wanted June 12, 2019
    How do you feel about PRO/CPAR being able to offer association health insurance as part of your benefits package with us? Will you give us 3 minutes and take a survey about your current health insurance situation and your interest in PRO/CPAR offering you an association plan? If you take the survey, you’ll be entered […]
    PROView
  • 2019 Florida Legislature adjourns: Remote notaries, open permits & environment among victories May 6, 2019
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — May 4, 2019 — 2:16 pm — Your world got a little bit easier thanks to new legislation that brings modern technology and common sense to transactions. The Florida Legislature, which ended its 60-day legislative session minutes ago, passed two bills many Florida Realtors’ members had requested. One allows the use of […]
    PROView
  • UPDATE: PRO/CPAR and HCAR merger March 25, 2019
    Pinellas Realtor Organization/Central Pasco Chapter members voted to merge with Hernando County Association of Realtors (HCAR). Although HCAR’s Board of Directors was on board to offer the Plan of Merger to its membership for a vote, an HCAR member filed a lawsuit to block the vote. A court order was issued forbidding their members from […]
    PROView
  • New FREC Team Rules: Are You Compliant? March 5, 2019
    Florida Real Estate Commission (FREC) has approved a New Team Advertising Rule that will impact brokerage office procedures and team advertising. Brokers and teams have until July 1, 2019 to comply, but it’s not too early to prepare. Teams “Team or group advertising” shall mean a name or logo used by one or more real […]
    PROView

Visit Me at Active Rain