You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Real Estate’ tag.

 

If you are wistfully looking out the window right now wishing it were time for vacation, you are not alone. In fact, Sherwin-Williams just announced the 2018 color of the year, and it basically looks like vacation splattered all over your walls.

Break out your paintbrushes, because Sherwin-Williams announced their 2018 color of the year
Image: Sherwin-Williams

by   http://www.sheknows.com/home-and-gardening/articles/1136438/sherwin-williams-2018-color-of-the-year

Sherwin-Williams has declared Oceanside their color of the year. It’s a deep blue-green hue that can’t help but make us think of travel. We want to be sitting by the ocean enjoying the breeze. Instead, we’re at work. Dreaming.

“People today have a growing sense of adventure, and it is making its way into even the coziest corners of our homes. We are craving things that remind us of bright folklore, like mermaids and expeditions across continents,”  Sue Wadden, director of color marketing for Sherwin-Williams, told People. “Oceanside is the color of wanderlust right in our own homes.”

If a vacation isn’t on your horizon quite yet, then painting your house with the hues of the ocean is a great backup choice. And if you are looking to be part of the trend but painting your walls is not an option right now, there are lots of great accessories that give you the same vibe, but will also allow you to get your security deposit back. .

Here are some of our favorite accessories that closely resemble Oceanside and will give your home a nice burst of color.

Break out your paintbrushes, because Sherwin-Williams announced their 2018 color of the year
Image: Etsy

This wall art found on Etsy is giving us all sorts of calming nature vibes.

Break out your paintbrushes, because Sherwin-Williams announced their 2018 color of the year
Image: JCPenney

We also love this fantastic hand-tufted rug, a great way to brighten even the most basic of room decor.

Break out your paintbrushes, because Sherwin-Williams announced their 2018 color of the year
Image: Ikea

Or, finally, this blanket from Ikea is a fun way to brighten up your drab couch.

Advertisements

On October 18th the Pinellas International Council held it’s monthly International Marketing Session with Martha Vasquez presenting on Canada. Martha shared how to connect with and do referrals with Canadian realtors, helpful websites, and much more in the hour long presentation. We had a great turnout. Thanks to our speaker, the Pinellas Realtor Affiliates and all those who attended this very informative presentation.

 

 

 

Erroneous assumptions about the business can cause a ton of confusion for the public about how the real estate process works.

The real estate process makes everyone an armchair expert by default. The buyer, the seller, their friends, co-workers and neighbors all know how real estate works.

After all, the last time they bought or sold a home was 10 years ago, and in their view, not much has changed. Misbeliefs and bad information are a dangerous combination.

People don’t know what they don’t know, and what they do know is enough to create false perceptions of a profession that is often surrounded by damaging assumptions. Here are 15 real estate myths — busted!

1. Real estate agents are paid a salary

Despite what many think, the public is horribly confused about how agents make a living.

There must be a salary floating in the background that supports agents — after all, how is it that they can appear so well-groomed, professional and polished while hosting lavish broker events, open houses or other marketing activities, showing customers around town all day and buying them lunch?

Attention perpetual house shoppers and sellers just testing the market: the agent’s time and expenses are 100 percent on them.

Are you a rich broker, or a poor broker?
How to drive automation and profit from Robert Kiyosaki’s ‘Cashflow Quadrant‘ READ MORE

There is no base salary or reimbursement for the time and money they’ve expended no matter the outcome, whether it’s 500-plus messages or hours of research, advice, problem-solving, trouble-shooting, giving insight over the phone or making countless trips to show property.

How would you feel if your employer decided, as part of its cost cutting, to not give you a paycheck for your all of your work and effort, especially on a big project that involved a tremendous amount of time and effort on nights, holidays and weekends?

2. The agent keeps all the commission

First, the public needs to understand that commission is legally paid to the agent’s employing brokerage company, which in turns pays the agent.

Depending on what side the agent is representing (buyer or seller), their brokerage will earn the listing or selling side commission unless the agent happens to be handling both sides of the transaction.

It is a rare occurrence, but it does happen, and doing so is never a walk in the park.

No matter what the commission is, the amount paid to the agent is not the entire commission — the brokerage takes its portion (to be able to run the company to support its agents and keep the lights on), and then the agent gets his or her split.

The split varies based on the company, business model and the agent’s level of production.

There are usually additional fees that come off the top of the gross amount of commission being paid to the brokerage.

By the time all is sliced and diced, the resulting amount to the agent may surprise you. Then that agent has to remember to withhold money for taxes and social security. They make a living just like everyone else; the difference is the check doesn’t come every two weeks.

3. The typical commission is 6 percent, right?

Speaking of which, I recently had someone ask me this exact question.

The buyer wanted to purchase one of my listings and assumed that I would be receiving the “standard 6 percent,” to which I explained that all commissions are negotiable and vary according to a variety of factors with type of property, price and such in my market.

Every market is different.

4. An agent’s gas, mileage and other transportation expenses are reimbursed 

If only real estate brokerages had a “transportation fund” to reimburse agents for these things.

The 25 trips to show a buyer homes every time a new one hit the market — only for the buyer to wait and see if something better comes along.

The three days spent driving all over town with a relocating buyer who decides not end up moving to that city.

The umpteen trips to a listing, prepping for showings, and continually checking on the vacant property; or meeting vendors contractors, photographers, etc. — none of it is paid for by anyone but the agent.

Driving into new construction neighborhoods that are rife with tire-puncturing nails — the gas, tolls, vehicle wear-and-tear and maintenance — it all adds up, and it’s all on the agent.

5. Marketing expenses aren’t the agent’s responsibility

Speaking of things the public thinks a brokerage pays for on behalf of an agent — don’t forget the marketing expenses!

Think about the several thousand dollars for video production, 3-D tours, digital marketing campaigns, specialty websites, broker open house events, the local symphony quartet playing on a red carpet greeting prospective buyers — not to mention the design and printing of brochures and the like.

Yep, this marketing is brought to you by — your neighborhood friendly real estate agent (sorry no corporate sponsor was available), who didn’t ask the seller to contribute one dime, even after agreeing to discount commission to make the seller happy.

And when the seller doesn’t follow the agent’s advice, won’t work with an offer that was received because it was “too low” and ultimately decides to pull the house off the market?

Oh well.

6. A home passes or fails inspection

An inspection is meant to assess the condition of a home. An inspector doesn’t “pass” or “fail” a home.

He or she will provide a report explaining all issues along with a summary of the age of key systems such as plumbing, electric, HVAC and the roof along with an estimate of economic life remaining on those systems.

7. Inspectors have to find something, don’t they?

Speaking of inspections, no one likes the idea of someone crawling around their home for a few hours with a camera and notepad making note of every crack, crevice and things that may not function to a certain standard.

Here’s the deal: inspectors are hired by the buyer to do an independent and objective evaluation of a property. The reality is they are going to find things — no property is perfect, even with brand new construction homes.

There is no secret conspiring happening behind the scenes. If the sellers are concerned about what might be found, the best way to level the playing field is to obtain their own pre-listing inspection before putting the home on the market.

8. Weekends bring out the most serious buyers

Contrary to popular belief, weekends don’t usually bring out the most serious and ready-to-buy buyers. Open houses and other open-to-the-community events tend to bring voyeurs, nosy neighbors and curiosity seekers interested in looking at decorating ideas and how other people live.

Just watch Zillow’s latest web series “Open House Obsessed” that follows people who have made a hobby out of going to open houses.

The most serious showings tend to happen during the week. In many markets, it is usually too late to wait until the weekend to look at any properties of interest.

9. Zillow says, therefore it is

When was the last time Zillow physically walked through a property, pulled relevant comparables, did specific adjustments and established an on-point range of value?

Zillow’s Zestimate gives a consumer a general idea of the value of a home — the company calls it a “starting point” — but by no means is it an exact valuation tool. Zillow can’t discern the difference between why homes on one street or in a particular area may be different value-wise versus those just two streets over.

It can’t tell the consumer why the last three sales sold for the prices they did and why a particular school is driving people to a specific neighborhood. Even Zillow’s CEO, Spencer Rascoff, sold his home for 40 percent less than the Zestimate showed in 2016!

10. It is better to price a home on the high side as the seller can always come down

This is one of the most common fallacies in real estate. Sellers want to protect their asking price so they think overpricing it is an effective defense mechanism against selling too low.

Newsflash: overpricing your home often leads to the home sitting and not receiving much interest. If a home is priced competitively from the beginning, the chances of attracting optimal traffic from the beginning greatly increases.

As a follow-up to this myth, sellers often say “well, a buyer can always make an offer,” but the problem is that when you’ve overpriced it, buyers may not look at the home in the first place, let alone put an offer in. You have to entice with the price.

11. When making an offer on a home, you need to start with a low offer

Just as sellers make a classic mistake of overpricing, buyers often make the mistake of wanting to start with a really low offer.

Although there is nothing wrong with negotiating, if the home is priced within range, an unrealistically low offer is only going to alienate the seller, and you won’t be taken seriously.

Don’t be surprised if you receive a very slight counter or no counter offer at all.

12. The longer a home is on the market, the more negotiable the deal

Not necessarily, and in fact, it may mean just the opposite. A home that lags on the market is likely sitting due to its asking price as well as its lot, layout, location or condition of the home.

An awkward layout or inferior location can also play a role. The seller may be unrealistic about their asking price or want the market to pay more than it is willing to bear.

13. Multiple price reductions mean the seller is desperate to sell

If a home has had multiple price reductions, that must mean the seller desperately needs to sell.

Price reductions are made to bring the property in line with current comparables, price it to be competitive or underprice it to help generate more traffic and interest.

Often when a seller has done several price reductions it means they are through with negotiation.

14. Multiple offers give the sellers an advantage

If a seller receives more than one offer and elects to simultaneously counteroffer all buyers, that increases their leverage and the likelihood of selling for top dollar.

Maybe but maybe not.

It can be easy to see dollar signs when there is more than one offer in hand from multiple buyers. Keep in mind that every buyer has a limit, and no one likes to be played.

Not every home is a must-have in every market, and there will always be another property that becomes available.

As a seller, if you play this card wrong, you could end up having the entire situation backfire and be forced to watch all the buyers walk away.

15. All agents are the same

Although the general process of buying or selling and the ensuing chain of events are similar, no two agents are the same, nor is their approach to real estate. The public often lumps all agents into the same bunch and considers them a commodity without really taking the time to study the differences in their approach, presentation and achievements.

As in every profession or organization, there are those who are committed to excellence, devote endless amounts of time and energy into working with buyers and sellers and are highly adept problem solvers. Others simply march to lower standards and do the bare minimum to get by.

Just as some attorneys and physicians are better than others, so are real estate agents. Some are more resourceful, responsive and creative.

Although a few photos and minimal listing description may be adequate in the eyes of one agent, another agent can’t imagine presenting a listing that wasn’t properly prepped for sale with staging, video, 3-D and a slick marketing campaign with professionally designed and produced collateral for digital and print.

In real estate, an agent can never assume, and the same goes for the public.

Cara Ameer is a broker associate and Realtor with Coldwell Banker Vanguard Realty in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. You can follow her on Facebook or Twitter.

Email Cara Ameer.

 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Seven real estate laws drafted by the 2017 Florida Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Scott went into effect Saturday, including a Florida Realtors priority: estoppel fee caps.

Laws effective July 1

  • Cap on estoppel certificate fees – Sellers of properties who live in an HOA, condo association or co-op will have a limit on the amount they’ll pay for an estoppel certificate, a document that informs a buyer if the seller is current with their dues and assessments. SB 398 (Sen. Passidomo, R-Naples) caps estoppel certificate fees at $250 for unit owners who are current in their assessments. Associations may charge an additional $100 for expedited estoppel certificates (delivered within three business days) and another $150 to owners who are delinquent in their assessments. The bill sets the price of estoppel certificates for multiple units owned by the same person and establishes a uniform, statewide format that ensures buyers and closing agents receive the appropriate information needed to close the real estate transaction. This bill also requires certificates to be valid for 30 days if delivered electronically or 35 days if delivered by mail.
  • Florida’s natural resources – More than $500 million is earmarked for Everglades restoration, beach renourishment and springs restoration. During the session, SB 10 (Sen. Bradley, R-Orange Park) served as the primary piece of policy legislation for Everglades restoration and establishes how the funding will be used for these projects. A key provision of SB 10 is the construction of a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee that is designed to curb nutrient and salinity levels that are harmful to Florida’s valuable natural resources.
  • Condominium termination law – Legislation passed in 2015 to protect condo owners from being forced to sell – possibly at a loss – has several loopholes that real estate investors and bulk buyers exploited. SB 1520(Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater) fine-tunes the rules and modifies the process by reducing the percentage of owners required to reject the termination – from 10 percent to 5 percent.
  • Condominium oversight – A South Florida news report of fraud in condo board elections, misappropriation of funds and rigged bids resulted in a Miami-Dade grand jury recommending changes to Florida’s Condominium Act. HB 1237 (Rep. Jose Felix Diaz, R-Miami) provides several new condo oversight rules: (1) a condo association with more than 150 units must publish its financial reports and other documents (bylaws, articles of incorporation, condo rules) on a password-protected web page; (2) if an owner is denied documents and fraud is proven, persons responsible for fraudulent activity could face felony charges; (3) the term of a condo board director is limited to eight years, with some exceptions.
  • Private flood insurance – As Realtors petition Congress to reauthorize the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), Florida lawmakers continue to work to attract private flood insurance capital to Florida. HB 813 (Rep. Larry Lee Jr., D-Fort Pierce) accomplishes two primary goals: (1) Rating flexibility for flood insurers is extended from 2019 until 2025 before they must follow guidelines similar to other lines of coverage – a way to encourage private insurers to enter the Florida market; (2) insurance agents can place flood policies with surplus lines insurers for two more years – until 2019 – before they must make a “diligent effort” to place the coverage with carriers regulated by the state. Diligent effort requires an agent to seek coverage and be rejected by at least three regulated carriers writing the same type of coverage.
  • Drone regulation – HB 1027 (Clay Yarborough, R-Jacksonville) preempts the regulation of unmanned aircraft systems (drones) by local governments and grants oversight to the state of Florida. This will prevent drone operators from having to potentially comply with ordinances adopted by 400+ local governments.
  • Pollution notification – SB 1018 (Sen. Denise Grimsley, R-Lake Placid) sets a threshold for when an operator is required to notify the Division of Emergency Management and the Department of Environmental Protection about a pollution event. It also provides a timeframe for the notification and defines what a reportable event means. This legislation is the result of pollution from a sinkhole at the Mosaic fertilizer facility in Mulberry, Fla., last summer. The Scott administration created an emergency rule that shifted the burden of pollution notification from the state to the owner of the property where the spill occurred. Florida Realtors was part of a coalition that successfully challenged the legal authority for this rule, creating an opportunity for the passage of this friendly legislation.

© 2017 Florida Realtors

7. Kitchen3

1766 Maryland Ave NE, St Petersburg, Florida

When a homeowner decides to sell their house, the number one thing that they want is, of course, the best possible price!! Right? Next, is that they want the least amount of problems to receive this price. Most sellers don’t realize all of the steps required to reach their goal. Marketing is more than sticking a sign in the yard, placing an add on Craig’s list or posting some photos on Facebook. Does the seller know how to stage the house to show it’s best appeal to the most buyers? Is the seller willing to answer phone calls 24/7, literally? Yes, at 2 in the morning when a buyer is searching the Internet! Does the seller know if the buyer is a serious buyer with their mortgage in place or are they pre-approved? In order to know all of these things & much more, a seller really needs to hire a real estate professional.

Technology has changed the buyer’s behavior during the home buying process. According to the National Association of Realtors’ 2016 Profile of Home Buyers & Sellers, the percentage of buyers who used the internet in their home search increased to 94%. However, the report also shows that 96% of buyers who used the internet when searching for homes purchased their homes through either a real estate agent/broker or from a builder or builder’s agent. Only 2% bought their homes directly from a seller that they didn’t know. Most of the buyers who bought homes directly from sellers (For Sale By Owner) still used a Realtor to represent them. Buyers start their search for a home online but then depend on an agent to find the home they will buy (50%), to negotiate the terms of the sale (47%) & price (36%), or to help understand the process (61%). There is so much information out there, either through the Internet or family & friends that more buyers are now reaching out to real estate professionals to help them through the very complicated process. The percentage of buyers who have used agents to buy their homes has steadily increased from 69% in 2001.


Sooooo, if you are thinking of selling your home, don’t underestimate the role a real estate professional can play in the process. The vast majority of buyers have realized that they actually need a Realtor in order to purchase their new home correctly. The laws regarding real estate change constantly & a professional Realtor will know the latest requirements & forms, as well as have a much larger audience with which to present your home in the best light.

NEW YORK – Feb. 8, 2017 – Women, on average, earn less than their male counterparts, but single females buy homes at more than twice the rate of men.

http://www.floridarealtors.org/NewsAndEvents/article.cfm?p=1&id=348220

In 2016, single women accounted for 17 percent of homebuyers in the last year compared to just 7 percent of single men, according to the National Association of Realtors® (NAR). The housing gender gap has existed for a while, but it continues to widen for a variety of reasons, according to Jessica Lautz, NAR’s managing director of survey research and communications.

For one, single women are more likely to be parenting on their own than single men; as such, they may be more likely to seek stable housing for their children. In 2011, there were 8.6 million single-mother households and only 2.6 million single-father households, according to the Pew Research Center.

“If you have children, it’s definitely going to play a role in where you’re thinking of living and how,” Lautz says. “And a mortgage can provide financial security. I think women, even with lower incomes, want a place where they can have roots and really own a place. The psychological desire to do that is great.”

And, despite cultural assumptions about women’s desire for marriage, single women without kids are more likely to be drawn to “singledom” lifestyles than men are, says Bella DePaulo, author of “Singled Out” and a professor at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

“Some research suggests that single women are especially unlikely to be lonely – again, contrary to our stereotypes,” DePaulo told Bloomberg. “Buying a home is a way of living your single life fully, rather than seeing your single years as just marking time until you find ‘the one.'”

The wage gap may still play a part in the house hunt, however. Single women tend to buy their first homes at an older age than men – 34 years old compared with 31, according to NAR research. They also tend to buy in a lower average price at a median $173,000 compared to $190,600.

http://www.floridarealtors.org/NewsAndEvents/article.cfm?p=1&id=348220

Source: “Why Single Women Are Buying Homes at Twice the Rate of Single Men,” Bloomberg (Jan. 31, 2017)

© Copyright 2017 INFORMATION, INC. Bethesda, MD (301) 215-4688

Are you a REALTOR who deals with international real estate and want to build “global” business skills? Then you need to attend this class!

Please join us on Thursday, February 2nd from 8:30 to noon.

You will learn from two international real estate experts on these subjects:

1. Opportunities for International Networking and Marketing Properties – Tami Simms, Coastal Property Group
* Understanding the importance of international buyers
* Resources for networking with international agents
* Where to market internationally
* How to market properties effectively to international buyers

2. Working with International Buyers and Sellers with a focus on the Asian market – Jiayin Liao, Bailey Glasser Law Firm
* Learn how to help Asians realize their dreams of a cross-border lifestyle
* Learn how to keep up with the latest information on both sides of the border and work together to determine the best course of action
* Become familiar with cross-border issues whether they are related to language, culture, law or just plain common sense.

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, text

June 2016 Visit my Website | AnnalisaWeller1@gmail.com
Pinellas Realtor Organization
Neighborhood Advocates Initiative
Flood Programs (Campaign #6 / 6.17.16)

Here’s an opportunity for homeowners in Pinellas County to reduce their flood insurance premiums. Many homeowners with flood insurance unknowingly pay higher rates for flood insurance than they have to.

There are many factors to consider when generating a flood insurance policy and its rates, and sometimes mistakes or miscalculations are made. These two events will give you the opportunity to hear about new changes to flood insurance. Afterwards, flood insurance evaluation professionals will sit with homeowners, one-on-one, to evaluate their policies.

On July 11 and July 12 you’ll have the opportunity to have your flood insurance policy evaluated with the possibility of a rate decrease. The first event is at the Pinellas Realtor Organization, 4590 Ulmerton Road in Clearwater. The second event is at the Tarpon Springs Community Center, 400 S Walton Ave in Tarpon Springs. Both events begin at 6:00pm with a general session, the individual meetings starting at 6:30pm.

Here are some questions worth noting:

  • How Do I RSVP? Email stpete@yourfloodrisk.com for the event in Clearwater or tarpon@yourfloodrisk.com, or call 856.723.3666 for both events.
  • Who is conducting the seminar? A company called Flood Risk Evaluator with the support of the Pinellas Realtor Organization and the Florida Association for Insurance Reform.
  • What is the cost? The entire event and evaluation is FREE. The only cost is possibly the overage you are paying for your current flood insurance policy!
  • What do I need to bring with me? You MUST have your elevation certificate and current flood insurance policy with you.

These issues have the potential to affect you and our local economy, so I thought that you might want to know about it. If you ever have questions, you can email me at AnnalisaWeller1@gmail.com or call me at 727-804-6566. Thank you so much.

© 2016 Pinellas Realtor Organization

An associate of mine is offering this 3 bedroom 1940’s block home on 1/3 acre for sale in St Pete Beach. Please contact me if you are interested or you know someone who might be interested in owning this rare large lot home.

 

 

Capture

Annalisa Weller, Realtor®, Certified International Property Specialist

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 336 other followers

List of Categories

Monthly archive of my posts

RSS PROView-Pinellas Realtor Organization

  • PRO will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 23 & 24 November 22, 2017
    Happy Thanksgiving to all of our members! Remember, PRO will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 23 & 24 in observance of the holiday. We will be open on Monday, Nov. 27.
    Josh Cruz
  • Brandi Gabbard & Penny for Pinellas are a win for St.Petersburg and the Realtor® Party. November 13, 2017
    The Pinellas Realtor Organization (PRO) supported candidate, Realtor Brandi Gabbard has won a seat on the St. Petersburg City Council, defeating Barclay Harless 61 percent to 39 percent. Gabbard is now the fifth woman on the council, joining Darden Rice, Amy Foster, Lisa Wheeler-Bowman and newcomer Gina Driscoll. We are proud and honored to count Gabbard as […]
    Josh Cruz
  • We’ve Got Florida Covered: PRO Members on National Association of Realtors 2018 Committees November 6, 2017
    Josh Cruz
  • Member Thomas Grayson passed away November 3, 2017
    GRAYSON, Thomas Nash 74, died unexpectedly October 12, 2017 at St. Anthony’s Hospital. Born in Bluefield, WV, January 29, 1943 to Edwin and Audrey Grayson, Tom moved with his family to St. Petersburg, FL, in 1958, where he attended St. Petersburg High School and later graduated from Largo High after the family moved to Seminole. With […]
    PROView
  • ‘Welcome’ to all our new members who joined us in October November 2, 2017
    The Pinellas REALTOR® Organization would like to welcome all of our new REALTORS® that joined us in October! We are happy to have you as a part of our organization and wish you much success in your careers. Abi Road Realty LLC Justyna  Ciszkowska Ameri-Tech Realty Inc Abin  Taraj Belloise Realty Tropical Yolanda A. Belloise […]
    PROView

Visit Me at Active Rain