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Dunedin is such a delightful little town and has so much going for it. Dunedin has beautiful beaches, parks, a marina that allows daily as well as long term rentals, many street fairs & festivals throughout the year, Honeymoon Island state park, water sports to baseball, loves dogs and definitely supports the arts. You can celebrate your Celtic heritage even if it’s not in your DNA. Here are just a few things to do in Dunedin this weekend. Enjoy!!

For more info go to:


Saturday, October 22, 2016 1:00pm

The Plainsmen Gallery, 2141 MAIN ST., DUNEDIN, Florida

An exhibition of western, wildlife and Florida art by local and national artists, including members of the Cowboy Artists of America. Watch artist Terry Smith’s painting demonstration, enter to win a limited edition print, and enjoy champagne and light appetizers. Free.


Saturday, October 22, 2016 2:00pm and Sunday, October 23 12pm

Edgewater Park, 51 MAIN ST., DUNEDIN

Bring chairs and blankets to the waterfront park for Olde Bay Cafe’s family festival highlighting local seafood, craft beers and crab dishes with live music by the Caroline Kole. Benefits Helping People Help Themselves.. Free (food/drink additional).


Saturday, October 22, 2016 5:30pm

Highlander Park, 1920 PINEHURST ROAD, DUNEDIN

The haunted fun includes “Boo in the Zoo” trick-or-treat house for preschoolers, carnival games, bounce houses, DJ music, haunted hayride, arts and crafts and age appropriate costume contests. $10 wristband; $5 hayride.


Saturday, October 22, 2016 7:00pm


Dress as your favorite spy or villain for a night of food and entertainment. Benefits Religious Community Services to assist the hungry, homeless and domestic violence survivors. $125.


Sunday, October 23, 2016 2:00pm

Dunedin Fine Art Center, 1143 MICHIGAN BLVD., DUNEDIN

Casual class explores a variety of food topics. $45, $35 members.


Learn about Venezuela on October 19 from 3:00 to 4:30 at the Pinellas International Council Marketing session at Pinellas Realtor Organization Thank you Ana Maria Tague for sharing your time, knowledge and experience with us!


I think that the best way to savour the flavors of Cuba is, like I did last summer, to visit Cuba with Cuban friends & family! But if you can’t travel to Cuba, this article I came across tells you where to get the delicious tastes of Cuba locally. ¡Disfruta tu comida! Annalisa

You don’t have to be Cuban to enjoy what their cuisine has to offer. Whether you opt for the traditional Cuban sandwich, the popular mojo pork, the necessary black beans and rice, ropa vieja and other tasty staples such as the decadent pastelitos, you can’t go wrong.

By Michelle da Silva Richmond

Havana Harry’s takes choices to a new level with fresh ingredients and a host of tempting choices, while old favorites such as The Floridian have been winning awards – and tempting palates – with a host of sandwiches and sides since they opened in 1993. Another favorite is Tangelo’s Grille where you can pick up an array of tasty brunch options along with Cuban staples.

A not-to-be-missed hole-in-the-wall favorite is Barracuda where you’ll find an array of selections including sweet cakes and pastries. Downtown St Pete is where you’ll find the ever – popular Bodega, which has been dishing up favorites to locals and visitors alike since 2013.

Then, of course, Columbia restaurants, in several locations are always a top choice.

Caribbean Café
Located in a small strip on Central Ave. the Caribbean Café offers tasty Cuban fare, while providing a pleasant break from the outside world. The soothing décor is the perfect backdrop for the specialties served there. As you might expect, the Cuban sandwich with the typical fixings is a popular choice, as is the Cuban pork and cheese sandwich, but you’ll also find an ample selection of lighter salads, soup, crab cakes and more. Dessert offerings include flan – plain and coconut – vanilla custard with caramel sauce and tasty cookies. Ask Jimmy, the owner for menu suggestions as well as their history.

The Floridian
The awards lining the walls are testament to their tasty cuisine, but the real proof comes when you sink your teeth into their award-winning Cuban sandwich. Loaded with ham, spiced pork, Genoa salami, Swiss cheese, dill pickle, mustard and a tasty mayo mix on pressed Cuban bread, it’s a great choice. The Floridian has been serving palate-pleasing cuisine to locals since 1993, offering a varied array of favorites that includes black beans and yellow rice, Cuban toast, spiced pork sandwiches and more. You’ll also find tasty guava and cheese pastries for dessert. For special occasions, you can’t go wrong with their party trays and a selection of Cuban finger sandwiches.

Tangelo’s Grille
Located in one of the area’s most charming areas, Tangelo’s has dished up a wide selection of Cuban fare since it first opened in downtown St Petersburg in 1987. It’s also one of the few places in the area where you can get brunch on weekends. Leading the list of favorites are the porky Cuban and TG Cuban sandwiches. The chicken mojo is another winner as are the TG coconut curry rice bowls. For dinner, roasted Cuban style pork is a crowd pleaser. Desserts offer key lime, peanut butter and Mounds coconut cream pies. For brunch, tacos, sandwiches and nachos lead the list along with the island custard French toast, which features cream cheese and guava. You can also get American classics such as eggs and waffles along with an assortment of coffees, mimosas and sangrias. (7278941695)

  • Order Online

Havana Harry’s Market 2
This newest addition to Havana Harry’s just opened in July 2016 a few miles from the original and is already drawing rave reviews. The underlying theme here is “family,” and “fresh, healthy food.” This family-owned restaurant spares no detail when it comes to delivering tasty Cuban cuisine with all the trimmings. A perennial favorite is the Cuban sandwich with smoked ham, mojo pork, Genoa salami, Swiss cheese, pickles, mayo and mustard. For lighter fare, try the 1904 Cuban tossed salad with lettuce, tomatoes, smoked ham, Swiss cheese, Spanish olives, asiago pepper, lemon and house dressing. Soups are also a hit including garbanzo or chicken and kale – all made from scratch. For special occasions, clients suggest ordering the whole salmon with raspberry chipotle dressing.

Tia’s Authentic Latin Food
This laid-back family-owned restaurant has been around for awhile and is a favorite with locals, as well as savvy tourists who crave authentic Latin American cuisine. The Cuban Reuben gets rave reviews with the addition of sauerkraut, instead of pickles to the mix. Empanadas also lead the list of top sellers. For dinner the slow roasted pernil (pork) roasted in garlic, mojo and home-made dressings is a sure winner. Daily specials and award-winning Cuban wine and beer add to the mix. For breakfast, there’s a selection of eggs, burritos, Cuban coffee and toast. Tia herself is usually on hand to greet customers.

Barracuda Deli Café
You might not expect a restaurant with such a name to be home to delicious Cuban and Mexican cuisine, but that’s just one of the pleasant surprises you’ll find at Barracuda. Tucked into the proverbial hole-in-the-wall on St Pete Beach, you’ll find an ample selection of pressed Cuban sandwiches, tacos, wraps and salads. Pork is marinated overnight and slowly cooked in a mojo sauce. The Best Cuban is a favorite as are the spicy pinto and black beans. On the lighter side you’ll find fresh salads and wraps. Side dishes include guacamole, chips and salsa and a freshly made soup of the day.

Columbia Restaurant – Sand Key
A Florida tradition – in various locations – since Cuban immigrant Casimiro Hernandez Sr opened his first restaurant in 1905 in Tampa’s Ybor City, Columbia restaurants are still owned and operated by the family’s fourth and fifth generations. Daiquiris, mojitos, margaritas and sangrias pave the way to a varied dining experience which includes Cuban mainstays such as: black bean soup, gazpacho, Cuban sandwiches, mojo chicken and more. Chicken croquettes, stuffed piquillo peppers and pork roast a la Cubana are additional hits. Desserts including flan, mango mousse cake, churros, key lime pie and more are sure to satisfy the most discerning sweet tooth. (7275968400)

It may not look like much, but this hole-in-the-wall walk-up eatery tucked into downtown St Petersburg’s Edge District is a “must” for anyone in search of fresh – and delicious – Cuban cuisine. Choose from a surprising selection of sandwiches, salads, sides and main dishes such as their legendary roasted pork (lechón) and coconut-marinated roasted chicken breast. The Miami-style Cuban sandwich features pork, ham, Swiss cheese, pickles and mayo on pressed Cuban bread. The popular pollo (chicken) sandwich features a coconut-marinated grilled breast with avocado, mango and jicama, adding a surprising crunch to the experience. Coffee selections include typical Cuban choices.

Habana Café

Visitors and locals alike rave about the old country Cuban cuisine you can treat yourself to at the Habana Café. Tucked into charming Gulfport, it’s a favorite with locals and tourists alike. Whether you select appetizers such as the tasty lechón asado, the drunken shrimp or go for mainstays such as the palomilla steak sandwich with grilled onions or the arroz con pollo – tender chicken cooked with Valencia rice in beer and wine, seasoned with fresh garlic, cumin, oregano, bell peppers and chopped onions – you can’t go wrong.The atmosphere is sheer Havana and the Latin music is a plus. (727-321-8855)

  • Order Online

Pipo’s Café
This family-owned St. Petersburg landmark has been consistently dishing up tasty Cuban fare since 1979, garnering top marks as one of the best in the area. Signature sandwiches such as palomilla steak – a tasty combination of grilled and breaded steak topped with parsley and grilled onions – or entrées such as mojo pollo – marinated chicken breast with onions, peppers and cilantro – are favorites. Desserts include the typical flan and arroz con leche. Breakfasts aren’t too shabby either with choices ranging from Cuban toast and guava pastries to a selection of tortillas (omelets) all served with fresh Cuban bread. (727-394-7476)

By Michelle da Silva Richmond


Tampa's 23-acre Julian B. Lane Riverfront Park is in line for a $35.5 million makeover. Money from Hillsborough County's voter-approved Community Investment Tax is expected to cover a little more than 40 percent of the cost. [City of Tampa illustration] 

TAMPA — This isn’t the first time Tampa has tried to do something bold and visionary and transformative at the 23 acres of Julian B. Lane Riverfront Park. But at $35.5 million, City Hall has never put this kind of money into the effort.


By RICHARD DANIELSON, Tampa Bay Times Staff Writer

“This park is not cheap,” Mayor Bob Buckhorn said at a mid-morning ceremony to kick of 18 months of construction at the park, which is just across the Hillsborough River from the David A. Straz Jr. Center for the Performing Arts. “But I think we also understand as a community the value of parks in our city. They are the common ground.”

It’s the biggest city project in West Tampa in decades, one that’s aimed at creating an urban park as active and popular as Water Works and Curtis Hixon Waterfront parks.

Officials also hope a re-energized Riverfront Park will draw new residents and investment to 120 nearby acres they are calling West River.

To pay for the project, City Hall will use $15 million of the $20 million Tampa received from BP because of lost tourism revenues after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Most of the rest of the project funds will come from the Community Investment Tax, the half-cent that Hillsborough County collects on sales to pay for schools, roads and other public projects.

“You will find something to do no matter what your tastes are in this park,” Tampa parks and recreation director Greg Bayor said. When the new park opens around February 2018, it will feature:

• A new river center with a community room, a large shaded deck, storage for rowing shells and dragon boats, a public dock, paddleboard rentals, a riverfront promenade and a sheltered cove where beginners can practice on calm water.

• A large lawn where people at art shows and concerts would have good views of the river and the downtown skyline.

• Tennis, basketball and pickleball courts, plus a lighted, synthetic-turf athletic field with bleachers for soccer, football and lacrosse.

• A family picnic area, a splash pad for children, a fenced children’s play area, a dog park and a water taxi stop.

“We’re making progress in West Tampa,” said City Council member Frank Reddick, who grew up three blocks away and learned to play tennis and basketball at the park. The finished park, he said, will create “what we all want in this community, and that is a safe, livable place where we can come and bring our families.”

‘Earth sculptures’

But to make room for the new amenities, the city will scrape the site bare of the defining features of the last big experiment there — the large earthen mounds, berms and swales designed by renowned New York architect Richard Dattner.

“I have heard about the replacement project, and am sad to see my park leveled,” Dattner, who is known for creating unorthodox, rough-hewn spaces for adventurous play, said in an email to the Tampa Bay Times.

In the mid-1970s, the city brought in Dattner to do something creative at what was then a flat, featureless park. The project was being done as part of the Model Cities program created by former President Lyndon Johnson, but money was limited. Dattner said Tampa officials wanted the resulting park to draw together mostly black neighbors and mostly white downtown office workers on their lunch hour. At the same time, officials were concerned about visibility and safety within the park.

Instead of putting up new buildings, Dattner designed the park with a series of “earth sculptures” — exterior rooms, he said, that were “carved out of earth berms to preserve the entire park as a green, landscaped surface.” Enclosed within man-made hills of various heights were an amphitheater and adventure playground with a ropes course, tennis courts, outdoor pool, central courtyard and fountain, tennis courts, and storage space and maintenance offices under a circular landscaped berm.

To get people walking across the park, making it safer in the process, Dattner laid out two tree-lined diagonal promenades that cross at the center of the park.

Dattner said the most original idea at work was to treat the entire site as a large earth sculpture, not only creating a green park at a reasonable cost, but providing high spots in the park to give visitors good views of the river.

“On a flat site, despite opinions to the contrary, only people at the water’s edge can actually see the river,” he said. “The built park was beautiful. Kids loved the water fountain in the activity circle as well as the slide safely descending from the top of the highest mound — in kids’ imaginations a ‘mountain’ in overwhelmingly flat Tampa. On my few visits after its completion I found a diverse group of all ages enjoying the variety of activities purposely provided.”

In the years that followed, however, one of the mounds was bulldozed, and more conventional playground equipment replaced the forts. The shuffleboard courts and pool were taken out. It became a little-used space. Former Mayor Pam Iorio commissioned a study that recommended improvements such as new softball fields, but Buckhorn discarded that in favor of a complete do-over.

It’s too bad, Dattner said.

“It could have been treasured, maintained, and gently upgraded to meet current requirements,” he said, “rather than demolished — a landmark landscape gone.”

‘Alien space mounds’

But the history of Riverfront Park goes back before the 1970s. In the 1940s, it was the site of stock car races on an oval track. During segregation, Tampa’s two black high schools, Middleton and Blake, played their home football games there, and Hillsborough and Plant played an annual Thanksgiving game there. And it was known as a place for neighborhood gatherings and weekend cookouts.

“A place where it didn’t matter which side of the city you were from,” said North Boulevard Homes residents council president David Gallon, who said the park means so much to him that he got married there. “When you came here, you were family.”

It’s no secret that Buckhorn doesn’t like Dattner’s design. He’s called the earth sculptures “alien space mounds” and says they obstruct views of the river.

Surveys done during the design process found that some residents didn’t know what was at Riverfront Park. The daughter of former Mayor Julian B. Lane has said that before the unveiling of the new design two years ago, she had never walked to the river through the park named for her father.

To give visitors views of the river and downtown’s skyline, the redevelopment of the park will flatten the mounds and create a grade that is highest next to North Boulevard and gently slopes down to the river.

Beyond this immediate project, officials hope remaking Riverfront Park will accomplish much of what Model Cities aimed to do.

Investing in Riverfront Park, Buckhorn hopes, will help Tampa compete for a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant to help pay for the West River plan. City Hall is moving a nearby truck maintenance depot and wants to sell the land for apartment development. North Boulevard Homes, Tampa’s oldest public housing complex, is earmarked for demolition. Housing officials plan to replace it with both subsidized housing and dwellings that sell or rent on the open market.

“It is the project that is the most transformative for West Tampa,” Buckhorn said. He said when Gallon and other North Boulevard Homes residents return to a redeveloped neighborhood, “they won’t have to live in a gang-infested, violent public housing project. They can live in a community that they are proud to call home and where everyone enjoys the same benefits.”

Contact Richard Danielson at (813) 226-3403 or Follow @Danielson_Times

There is a clear connection between the quality of schools and the value of the homes near them. Families want to raise their children near good schools.


Pinellas Realtor Organization
Neighborhood Advocates Initiative
School Grades (Campaign #9 / 10.2016)

Sometimes though, it can be difficult to differentiate which schools are considered “good schools.” One resource available to you is the annual report released by the state of Florida. This report grades all public schools on performance, and the state has made the results public at

The state releases this important data annually, but usually after the school year starts. It may be too late this year to make any changes for your family, but there is always an opportunity to get involved, or move to a new school next year.

Remember, a key factor for the success of our schools is volunteer involvement. Every school has opportunities for parents, and non-parents, to contribute. Kids need mentors and coaches, someone to help make them a healthy meal or put a band-aid on a cut. In the end, community involvement in our schools makes them better, and in turn, keep our neighborhoods and home values strong.
Here are some highlights from this year’s report:
Grades are for 2015-2016: Each school grade consists of data compiled from that school year. Historic performance data is not considered, so past success does not influence current grades. To be fair, an “A” rating is very difficult to achieve. Only three school systems in the state attained that status this year.

What if your school’s grade is a “D” or “F?”: That’s not good, but don’t lose hope! State and local governments use the data to guide policy and steer resources to the places of most need. And to date, this policy has seen success. This year 58% of last year’s “D” and “F” schools improved at least one letter grade. While this is not a complete turnaround, they are now on the path to being great schools.

Pinellas County: Three of the five schools spotlighted in the Tampa Bay Times “Failure Factories” series improved. They still have a way to go to be on par with the county’s overall status a “B” county, but things are getting better. Pinellas County received an overall rating of “B” for school year 2014-2015.

Pasco County: Unfortunately, Pasco County schools on the whole underperformed compared to 2014-2015 going from a “B” district to a “C” rated district. Several schools did see some improvement, but overall, not a banner year for Pasco County Schools.

Hillsborough County: Like Pasco County, Hillsborough County saw some regression going from an overall “A” rating to a “B.” While still a strong school system, any step backwards is unfortunate and requires attention.

It is important to understand how our schools can impact neighborhoods and our real estate. Know that I work to stay informed about issues that affect property rights and values and will keep you informed as well.

You can find out more at

If you ever have questions, you can email me at or call me at 727-804-6566.

© 2016 Pinellas Realtor Organization

539 Baywood Dr S

Selling a home is a very complicated process-more complicated and costly than homeowners realize resulting lower sales prices, hidden fees and taking more time to sell. Sometimes homeowners can not fully understand reports that they have found on the Internet or the information that homeowners receive from well meaning friends & family may not be completely accurate, which can result in under pricing or over pricing their home. Sometimes homeowners are not aware of the latest changes in the law, which forms are now required or the time constraints required. Here are a few good reasons, For Sale By Owners should consider using a Realtor to represent them in the sale of their home.

1. For Sale By Owner (FSBO) homes generally sell for less

In 2015, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR) report, FSBOs lost about 16% of the sales price with a median selling price of $210,000 (Realtor-assisted homes sold for $249,000). If the seller sold to someone that they knew, the median dropped to $151,900. 

  • Eighty-seven percent of buyers recently purchased their home through a real estate agent or broker.
  • Eighty-eight percent of buyers would use their agent again or recommend their agent to others.
  • Only eight percent (down from nine percent) of recent home sales were FSBO sales. This is the lowest share recorded since this report started in 1981.

Homeowners don’t realize how much time & effort it takes throughout the complicated process, may not understand market reports and don’t have the resources & connections to market the property properly-on the Internet & to other Realtors who may bring the buyer.

2. For Sale By Owners spend more time on the market

Unless the homeowner knows someone who wants to buy their home, FSBOs take longer to sell than homes listed with a Realtor. On average, 18% of For Sale By Owner homes were unable to sell within their expected time and took a year to sale.

3. Paperwork can be overwhelming

According to 2015 National Association of Realtors’ Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers finding & understanding all of the paperwork was one of the most difficult tasks for the sellers, especially without the guidance of a Realtor. Depending on the state, there are a many legal forms that are required, including but not limited to a sales contract, property disclosures, occupancy agreements and lead paint records. Also how the escrow must be held in their state.

4. Marketing is limited when owners sell their own home

For sale by owners have limited resources to market their homes. The 2015 NAR Profile of Buyers and Sellers showed 42 percent use only a yard sign, 32 percent rely on friends and family, and about 15 percent use social media. Even paying to just be on the MLS listing isn’t enough because it doesn’t go on real estate companies’ websites & their various Internet connections. It also is not sent out to other Realtors, offices or discussed at Realtor Networking events or at “pitch” sessions. These are just a few of the many resources that professionals have at their fingertips. 

5. Hidden costs can add up

Most For Sale By Owners’ first thought is about saving money. But they usually don’t realize they will be paying for a lot of extras: signs, flyers, photography, MLS listing, attorney (required in multiple states for FSBOs), home warranty (optional but hard to sell FSBO without one), home inspection, a wood destroying pest inspection, credit report for buyers (if applicable), contracts and the list goes on. The marketing costs are generally included in the Realtor’s commission.

6. Inspections can be problematic

Homeowners may not know which inspection companies are fully licensed & which inspections are required. Some states require a general home inspection, wind mitigation, 4 point and/or a wood destroying pest report. Homeowners who don’t know the rules may have unnecessary and costly repairs as well. A Realtor can advise & negotiate on the necessary repairs.

7. Liability is all on the seller

Everyone makes mistakes. A seller (or buyer) who doesn’t have the representation of a licensed agent pays for those mistakes. So if homeowner lists something as a feature and the buyer notices that this is incorrect, chances are the seller is going to pay for that mistake. A Listing Agent would have corrected the mistake before the home was listed. A Buyer’s Agent would have pointed out the mistake to the buyer, which could result in a lower price on the home.

8. Horrible as it sounds, scams can happen

Common scams include fraudulent papers (appraisals, loan documentation), fraudulent escrow deposit information, foreign buyer deposits (scammer sends too much in a bad check and then requests a refund), purchases through a third-party (a fake attorney, etc.) and asking for personal information to be used for identity theft.

9. Time costs the seller money

How much time does the homeowner plan to take to fully market the home? How much time does the homeowner plan to take off from work? Is the homeowner willing & able to answer calls from buyers at all times of the day & night? What will it cost & how much time will it take for an attorney to review the contract, if they choose one. How will the homeowner show the home, screen the buyers for safety, screen for qualified buyers, set up an escrow account, and maintain a marketing campaign? A For Sale By Owner home will take a homeowner a whole lot longer to sell. Homeowners don’t have the expertise or the access to the resources agents have.

 These are just some of the issues that For Sale By Owner must address but there may be more.Realtors can save sellers time, money, liability and hassle while guiding them through this ever-changing complicated process.


American flag

The election is on November 8th. Most of us can’t wait-there really is more happening in the world than just the USA’s election. In many states the deadline to register is 30 days before the election. Please check your state’s requirement & get out there to vote.  Below is the link for each states requirements & a place to check to see if you are indeed registered.

Let’s vote!! In some countries people risk their lives to vote or travel for days to vote. In the USA, it is your right & it’s easy to vote. So as Nike says, Just DO It!!

Voter Registration Deadlines for the General Election by State


6913 14th St N, St Petersburg, Florida

Buyers on the hunt for the perfect home often overlook common issues that could cost them thousands of dollars and lead to buyer’s remorse.

Taken from “6 Things Home Buyers Forget to Do: Did You Forget Them Too?”

Realtors can help clients focus on these four often-forgettable things during their house hunt:

Not counting all the expenses of homeownership
“People focus so much on mortgage payments and closing costs,” says Brendon DeSimone, author of “Next Generation Real Estate. “What they don’t realize, until after the fact, is that there are expenses like oil or propane and landscaping that are built into homeownership.” Homebuyers should ask sellers for a property expense list to get a better gauge of what they’ll be paying each month. Also, financing experts often suggest setting aside 1 percent of the home’s total value annually for repairs and maintenance.

Failing to consider a home’s resale value
Few buyers actually stay in their home for decades. When visiting listings, buyers should talk to their real estate agent about trends in the neighborhood and the likelihood that the home would sell for the same amount in two years, five years or 10 years down the road, says Avery Boyce, a real estate professional with Compass Real Estate in Washington, D.C.

“Buying a home should make financial sense now, but if circumstances make this home no longer the right one within a few years, you don’t want to be in a tricky financial situation while trying to sell,” Boyce says.

Not investigating the neighborhood
DeSimone suggests that homebuyers walk around the neighborhood at different times of the day. Talk with the neighbors too.

Failing to look into the homeowners association
“Never close on a home without doing serious due diligence on the homeowners association,” says DeSimone. Many HOAs can be supportive, but there have been reports of a few cases where homeowners have clashed. Also, find out if there are a lot of delinquent homeowners in the neighborhood because “if there is an upcoming assessment, or there are delinquent homeowners, the HOA and you will have to cough up the money to cover it,” DeSimone says.

Source: “6 Things Home Buyers Forget to Do: Did You Forget Them Too?”® (July 2016)


Art, music, sports, museums & beaches… there’s so much to do! What are you up to this weekend? Gorgeous sunny day-get out there & enjoy it!!

Arts Alive: Free Museum Day in the Burg
St Petersburg celebrates the arts. Visit 9 museums for free between 10 & 3 today. Participating museums include:
Creative Clay, 1114 Central Avenue
Dr. Carter G Woodson Museum, 2240 9th Avenue South
Florida CraftArt, 501 Central Avenue
Florida Holocaust Museum, 55 5th Street South
Morean Arts Center, 719 Central Avenue
Morean Arts Center for Clay, 420 22nd Street South
Museum of Fine Arts, 255 Beach Drive Northeast
St. Pete Museum of History, 335 2nd Avenue Northeast
The Dali (Pinellas Country residents only), 1 Dali Boulevard

For more information:  Park in downtown garages and ride the St. Petersburg Trolley Downtown Looper or Central Ave. Trolley routes to most locations.

Central Avenue Solstice – Eight Mile Long Street Festival
The 2nd Annual Central Avenue Solstice is an all-day free celebration along Central Avenue featuring arts, music and more. The event begins on the far east end of Central Avenue and moves west to the Gulf of Mexico as the sun sets. The solstice festival starts in South Straub Park and ends in the West Central Village Sunset park for a free screening of the film Big, presented by St. Petersburg Preservation. The yoga session in South Straub Park from 7-9am. After, restaurants along Central Avenue will feature $5 Sunny Side Up Breakfast specials from 8-11am, and $7 High Noon Lunch specials from 12-2pm, loads of art, four stages of live music, more food, and more drink, along the entire route of Central Avenue. For more information:

TBBCA Chalk Walk Festival
A celebration of Live Art as 10 talented, commissioned chalk artists bring amazing drawings to life. TBBCA Chalk Walk is a free, family-friendly, accessible community event enjoyed by people of all ages and levels of art appreciation.Presented in partnership with the Tampa Bay Businesses for Culture and the Arts and the St. Petersburg Arts Alliance. Runs from 10am-5pm. South Straub Park, 250 Beach Drive Northeast.

Keep St. Pete Lit Presents: City-Wide Read and Write In at South Straub Park
Keep Saint Petersburg Local, Keep St. Pete Lit, and Saint Petersburg Public Library System present a program of the Read Local St. Pete Initiative with a City-Wide Read and Write-In at South Straub Park. Bring your picnic blankets, favorite books, or notepads. Relax in the grass and allow your imagination to bask in the sunshine and fresh air. They will have a special area for writers with writing prompts to get your imaginations brewing. Runs from noon-5pm. South Straub Park, 250 Bayshore Drive Southeast.

Tampa Bay Rays vs. Boston Red

September 24 – 6:10 pm

September 25 – 1:10 pm

Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Drive, St. Petersburg, FL

The Many Faces of Casa Masquerade Benefit

September 24 – The Many Faces of Casa Masquerade

St. Petersburg Yacht Club, 11 Central Ave., St. Petersburg, FL starts at 6:30 pm
A fundraiser benefiting CASA in memory of Stacey J. Plummer, who lost her life to domestic violence on September 24, 2006.
Tickets or sponsorships available. Individual tickets $150 pp, $300 per couple. Ticket includes gourmet dinner, entertainment, one drink ticket per person, free valet parking.

Bourbon, Beer and Bluegrass at The Vinoy (Friday and Saturday)
The Vinoy Renaissance Resort & Golf Club, in partnership with Bluegrass bands Wood & Wire, Highway 41 South and Town Mountain present a special “Beer, Bourbon and Bluegrass” event. This special concert series takes place on the weekends of September 23-24, September 30-October 1,October 7-8. This weekend, Wood & Wire will perform live from 6pm to midnight both Friday andSaturday. the dinner and concert series includes five dining stations, a full bar and bourbon and beer flights/tastings. Tickets are $64 each. The Vinoy, 501 5th Avenue Northeast.

At Home With Diversity® is an educational experience designed to present a picture of the changing face of the real estate industry. Since 1998, the At Home With Diversity® program has prepared over 20,000 REALTORS® to work effectively with and within today’s increasingly diverse pool of homebuyers.

Please join us as instructor Phil Riek, the 2016 Florida Realtors Education Individual Achievement Award winner, leads you through this informative class on September 22, 2016 to be held at the Pinellas Realtor Organization building at 4590 Ulmerton Road, Clearwater Florida from 8:30-5pm.

The At Home With Diversity® Course teaches REALTORS® how to:

* Assess and understand attributes of diversity in local markets and their impact on the real estate industry
* Build a business plan and selling strategy to successfully service all client profiles
* Understand basic competencies to earn the confidence of potential buyers and sellers, regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, handicaps, familial status, or national origin

Note: As with many NAR certification/designation courses, this certification may have additional requirements. For more information, call NAR Resort at 800-874-6500 ext. 8393 or visit the NAR At Home With Diversity webpage.

PRO Members:
Click here to register

PRO Members – would you like a scholarship to help pay for this course? The REALTOR® Professional Development Scholarship is available for you, courtesy of the Pinellas REALTOR® Foundation and the Affiliate Business Partners of PRO. Click here to learn more and apply.Note: the scholarship does not cover any additional costs associated with obtaining the certification. If you’re interested in the scholarship, REGISTER AND PAY FOR THIS COURSE FIRST, then fill out the application on the webpage linked above. We request that you register and pay for the course first to guarantee your spot since scholarships and seating are limited. If you are awarded, we will issue you a check.

Click here to register.

Contact: Jan Dean
Phone: 727-216-3004



Annalisa Weller, Realtor®, Certified International Property Specialist

(727) 804-6566

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  • Member Leisa Erickson featured as Top Real Estate Agent in Florida Edition of Top Agent Magazine October 20, 2016
    Leisa Erickson, of Erickson & Assoc., a Re/Max Metro sales team was featured as a top real estate agent in the Florida Edition of Top Agent Magazine in October 2016. Top Agent Magazine is the premier real estate magazine featuring the foremost real estate agents and mortgage professionals in the USA, Europe, Canada, Australia, and [...]
  • PRO launches REALTOR® Champion Fund October 6, 2016
    There are many issues at the local level that impact the consumer’s ability to buy and sell real estate, which in turn impacts the livelihood of REALTORS®. Did you know that the Pinellas REALTOR® Organization is currently working to protect REALTORS® from point-of-sale inspections, property rights restrictions, and higher property taxes? Examples of other is […]
  • PROFarm Sales Open Oct. 25 October 6, 2016
    The almost wait is over! PROFarm – Farm Area Realtor Marketing (FARM) – is PRO’s latest innovation. Postal routes are offered on a first-come, first-served basis with a 12-month introductory agreement. PROFarm includes one postcard every month to your farm area. Sales open ONLINE ONLY at at 12:00pm on Tuesday, October 25. You will […]
  • Active with Contract status removal October 5, 2016
    After much review and consideration, the MFRMLS Board of Directors has approved the elimination of the Active with Contract (AWC) status. Below are key items to know regarding this change. • On November 1, 2016 the option to select Active with Contract (AWC) as astatus in Matrix will be disabled. • All listings currently in [...]
  • PROFarm Launch Party 10/18 October 3, 2016
    Tuesday, October 18 4:00 – 6:00pm PRO (Auditorium C) FREE Reception with food and drinks! RSVP HERE Position yourself as the professional, neighborhood-centric Realtor® you are! Make plans to join us for our PROFarm Launch Party on Tuesday, October 18 from 4:00 – 6:00pm at PRO (Auditorium A). NOTE: Location was previously published as Bascom’s, [...]

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